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WINNER: GEORGE KILLASPY • POLARESCENT


George Killaspy’s winning proposal, Polarescent, tackles the issue of colour temperature in the illumination of art. Starting from the assertion that different artworks require different types of illu- mination - some a warmer light, others a harsher, colder blue - he developed a sin- gle fixture that could adapt as required, reducing the amount of refitting neces- sary during change over of exhibtions. Using a polarising filter, Polarescent is able to easily switch between the two, or indeed any colour temperature in between.


Discreetly recessed into a wall or ceiling, the spotlight’s ball-and-socket joint to


allow a full range of movement to accom- modate shifting arrangements of art; and the aluminium facia is both elegant and subtle enough so as not to distract from the art. Powered by a dimmable LED spotlight with a GU5.3 fitting for compatibility, the Polarescent requires only a 12V supply and has a very low 10W current drain - providing an eco-element and cutting energy costs.


WINNER: XANDER DAWOOD • ARCLITE


Designed by Xander Dawood, Arclite is a wirelessly remote-controlled luminaire that can be manoeuvred to precisely illuminate paintings and sculptures in a gallery space.


The fixture is capable of panning through 360° with a 90° vertical movement. Its square aperture can focus a precise, even beam of light onto an art piece and, when not required, can be fully retracted into


the bezel to act as an ordinary downlight. It can be installed as a direct replace- ment for a standard 12V halogen down- light, as it can fit in an existing standard diameter hole and use the existing power feed.


THE FINALISTS 6 7 8


Whittled down from over 100 entrants, the other eight finalists had much to be proud of. Their work included: 1) Aurora by Martin Crick - a patterned lighting effect able to fit within any space. 2) Sunrise Light by Andrew Guscott - a hotel wake-up system. 3) Rectoflector by Philip Steiger for evenly spread light intensity reflection. 4) Beam by Ronan Taggart - a touch sensitive modular banister lighting system. 5) Rail Guide, by Andrew Binnie - a guidance solution for both outdoor & indoor railing. 6) Twist & Turn by Andrew Allan - a track spotlight that is adjusted using a lockable pole for use in gallery and museum environments. 7) Light Shroom by Peter Hunter - a new type of park lighting. 8) Illumina by Gabriel Boulton-Oliver - wall mounted, rotational gallery lighting.


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