This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
022


DETAILS [editorial]


Paul James, editor, writes: That’s it! I’ve had enough! Don’t get me wrong, I’m as environmentally friendly as I can possibly be. I recycle religiously, I’m forever following my wife in the house turning off light switches and the TV stand-by button. Hell, I even don’t flush until the smell gets too bad! But if I get one more press release from a manufacturer extolling the sustainable virtues of a project, I will scream! Actually, that’s a lie. I already have screamed. Loudly. Wasting a lot of my energy.


I have seen many lighting schemes recently where energy efficiency is the only redeeming feature. Even the quality of


light has been poor but hey, as long as it saves money! And let’s not talk about the ‘design’ of the schemes... My top was finally blown when I received a phone call from a manufacturer’s PR ‘representative’ about a particularly ‘exciting’, large retail scheme where the metal halide downlights were ripped out and replaced with LED ones. I held the phone away from my ear as the PR person got more and more animated about the energy saving credentials of the project. “What about the design of the scheme?” I asked. “The design?” the PR asked, bemused. “Yes, what was the design concept?” I queried. “There is no design, this is a sustainability story,” countered the PR. “I think you’ve got the wrong magazine,” I sighed. “But...” He must have got cut off... (true story, I had really had enough). Throughout the pages of this issue (our biggest ever, by the way) you will see stories where design is the cornerstone of the lighting scheme with, yes, sustainability a close second. If a scheme is designed well, the energy efficiency surely must follow. Even in projects where saving money is a major factor for the client such as in a casino, (see our story starting on page 119) the lighting designers were still more concerned with creating an appealing environment through design. The clue is in the name of our profession of which I am proud to be involved: LIGHTING DESIGN. Overzealously environmental manufacturers and their PR firms need not apply.


Pete Brewis, deputy editor, writes: In many ways the size of this issue is indicative of an industry that has really hit its 2012 stride. With the creative buzz of The ARC Show still humming in our ears, it’s time once again to gird our col- lective loins in preparation for the technological onslaught of Light + Building. Impressively, even with L+B just around the corner, The ARC Show 2012 proved consistently busy with plenty of new products and inspiring debate to take in. It was further proof that, as the saying goes, ‘Size isn’t everything’. Smaller domestic shows can offer huge advantages, with connections easier to make, contacts easier to maintain, and conver- sations easier to conduct; it is, in short, a snapshot of the industry in a more digestible chunk. And if a show can find a niche – as The ARC Show has with its focus on creativity and innovation - the benefits multiply yet further. The reverse is equally true. In the decorative & design world, Milan’s Salone del Mobile remains one of the dominant events, but there are some within its sphere of influence who feel its mammoth size is in danger of tipping the balance, with the effort and cost of attendance gradually outweighing any benefit gained. In contrast, smaller shows across Europe in cities like Berlin and Stockholm (see page 145) have fast gained in importance. Ostensibly domestic in nature, they find it easier to use nationality and the pull of city-specific creative commu- nities as a hook on which to hang a wider, more globally inclusive event. Small, as they say, is beautiful. But sometimes Big is Brilliant. As daunting as the prospect of Light + Building can be, it remains an essential opportunity for members of the industry to come together and reveal their hands. Two years ago, LEDs proved the strongest suit as manufacturers across the spectrum threw in their chips with solid state light sources. We’re looking forward to seeing what this year’s story will be...


Editorial Editor Paul James


(p.james@mondiale.co.uk)


Deputy Editor Pete Brewis (p.brewis@mondiale.co.uk)


Advertising Advertising Manager Jason Pennington


(j.pennington@mondiale.co.uk)


Advertising Sales John-Paul Etchells (jp.etchells@mondiale.co.uk)


Subscriptions Laura McLaughlin


(l.mclaughlin@mondiale.co.uk)


Production David Bell (d.bell@mondiale.co.uk)


Dan Seaton (d.seaton@mondiale.co.uk)


Mel Robinson (m.robinson@mondiale.co.uk)


Chairman Damian Walsh


(d.walsh@mondiale.co.uk)


Finance Director Amanda Giles


(a.giles@mondiale.co.uk)


Credit Control Donna Barlow


(d.barlow@mondiale.co.uk)


mondo*arc magazine ltd Waterloo Place Watson Square Stockport SK1 3AZ United Kingdom T: +44 (0)161 476 8350 F: +44 (0)161 429 7214 www.mondoarc.com mondo@mondiale.co.uk


Annual Subscription rates: United Kingdom £30.00 Europe £50.00 ROW £65.00


To subscribe visit www.mondoarc.com or call +44 (0)161 476 5580


mondo*arc, ISSN 17535875, is published monthly by Waterloo Place, Watson Square, Stockport, Cheshire, SK1 3AZ


Subscription records are maintained at Waterloo Place, Watson Square, Stockport, Cheshire, SK1 3AZ


Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228