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Kettles – value and volume trends in 2009/2010 Value


Value £


Total Jug


Traditional Travel kettle


Hot water dispenser Kettles


In terms of models, it is the traditional kettle which has performed best during the last year, up nearly 45% in value to £21.2 million and 42% in volume to 785,867 units. Average price has only risen slightly by just over 2% to £26.97, so these sales are down to more consumers wanting a traditional look (that and heavy price promotion perhaps). The largest sector within kettles remains the jug, at £144.9 million (up 4.44%) and eight million units (down 2.3%). Travel kettles continue to slide (down now to just over £2.3 million) as do hot water dispensers (down to £5.9 million) so the main activity is between jug and traditional styles.


172.1m 145m 21.2m 2.38m 5.95m


Volume


44.95 -10.81 -7.12


8,955,387 8,042,880 785,867 181,319 126,683


Volume


% growth (‘000 units) % growth 7.68 4.44


0.4


-2.3 41.9 -11.3 -2.8


Source: GfK


Deco Jug by Meyer Group


Price remains an issue in kettles and will continue to be so as long as supermarkets can sell a reasonably fully-featured model (for example with rapid boil and concealed element) for as little as £15.


Juicers


This was something of a disappointment during the last year (a 16.5% drop in volume but a 1% increase in value), unlike the category housing blenders and smoothies (‘food prep 1’) which has seen healthy rises in value and volume. It might well be the case of consumers becoming a little bored with the worthier healthy eating products (whereas blenders are quick, easy, less mess to deal with). ■


IndependentElectricalRetailer 82 BusinessBook2011


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