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BBT ROUNDTABLE


PEOPLE TEND TO FALL INTO BUSINESS TRAVEL


part of the UK’s economy, especially inbound. The amount of hotel accommoda- tion taken up through events is huge and, of course, a lot of TMCs do events as well. The events industry is worth £42 billion.


INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT BUYING BUSINESS TRAVEL: Do you think students, as well as colleges and universities, appreciate the sheer size of the corporate travel sector? ADRIAN: Lena is working on a project for the GTMC, interviewing lecturers to get their feedback on why business travel isn’t in the curriculum. LENA: The module I’m doing is an industry-based project, and Adrian is my mentor. We’re focusing on the lack of business travel among academ- ics, and also the curriculum side. A lot of the module leaders don’t have a background in corporate travel; it’s more leisure based. A lot also has to do with the advisory board; they feel there is more employability in the leisure side rather than corporate, so that’s why it’s not addressed. ADRIAN: What about a business like Amadeus? It’s interesting because when we first talked to students at Bournemouth University, they’d never heard of Amadeus. It’s the second largest transactional company after Amazon. I know Amadeus do a lot of intern-type work, and Liz [Emmot, UK general manager] talked at the Bournemouth University Tourism and Hospitality Fusion Summit in February. So if you talk to universities about Sabre, Amadeus, Travelport, they know the role in the leisure sector, but not the business sector. And what about the payments sector? It’s massive as well. There are opportunities to go and work for companies, such as Barclaycard. KAREN: It’s a massive ecosystem. We covered this in our diploma… when I was doing the research for that, Amazon was coming up, and companies like that, the disruptors; they’ve all got big ecosystems. Then I looked at breaking it down in the travel sector, and I thought we’re trailblazers because we’ve had this big ecosystem for so long – there’s payments, se- curity, insurance, hotels, airlines... people aren’t aware of that in colleges and universities. DEEPAM: You don’t really hear about these compa- nies, unless they actually come into the university. You hear about techno- logical disruption from the assignments you’re doing, but you don’t know


the companies that are related to it. It would be good if they came into universities, for guest lectures, or career fairs... it would be interesting if someone from a TMC came, because that’s the only chance for [students] to get an idea. LENA: I agree. TMCs should come in and work with universities, to create more awareness... so we learn about what corporate travel actually is.


84 MAY/JUNE 2019


THE GTMC VIEW: ADRIAN PARKES


As part of the our continued commitment to developing talent across the business travel sector, we created a dedicated “GTMC Education” initiative. It consolidates long-standing programmes, such as GTMC People and Talent and Next Generation Strategy Groups, alongside the GTMC Diploma and new “Pathway to Business Travel Professional” apprenticeship programme, both in partnership with Travilearn. These efforts coincided with a groundbreaking


partnership between the GTMC and Bournemouth University’s Department of Tourism and Hospitality, to raise awareness of the business travel sector career options available to students. Most recently, our efforts with learning institutions branched out to East Sussex College, where GTMC’s team members spoke to an audience of 100 students about career opportunities in business travel. The ethos for the “GTMC Education” initiative further


supports the GTMC’s mission to future-proof the sector for generations to come.


increased productivity


of SMEs that employ apprentices report


75% 90%


of apprentices stay in employment after their scheme ends


SOURCE: DfE buyingbusinesstravel.com


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