search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ADVERTORIAL FEATURE


BACK TO SCHOOL


Blue Cube drives online adoption with new business travel product training for bookers


BUSINESS TRAVEL IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST areas of expenditure for many organisations, so asking their travel management company (TMC) to implement an online booking tool can certainly be one way of helping reduce those costs. Self-booking tools in the corporate space have evolved considerably in terms of functionality and user experience since they were first conceived around 25 years ago. But despite the technology getting better, adoption of these solutions by bookers and travellers still presents challenges for both TMCs and corporates. Last year, Blue Cube Travel invested in a new online booking tool, BC Online powered by Atriis, an NDC IATA level 3-ready solution that gives clients superior functionality via a user-friendly interface. However, Blue Cube recognised that clients would only benefit from BC Online, in terms of time and cost savings, if bookers using the tool were given bespoke training – not just technical training on how to use the tool, but practical business travel product knowledge. “We recognised that corporates struggle to get their bookers to adopt online tools, because although these tools have got much better in recent years, they are still behind the curve if you compare them to leisure travel self-booking tools,” said Rebecca Deadman, commercial director, Blue Cube. “EAs and PAs are used to booking their own leisure travel with one click, but booking business travel via an online tool is completely different – there are travel policy constraints to consider, different fare


types, classes of travel, hotel products. It can be a minefield for a travel booker.” For that reason, Blue Cube has introduced an eight-module Booker Travel Training Programme for clients using the TMC’s online solution. Each module takes one hour and is delivered monthly in person by Blue Cube’s account managers to


“WE RECOGNISED THAT CORPORATES STRUGGLE


TO GET THEIR BOOKERS TO ADOPT ONLINE TOOLS”


bookers at the client’s premises. The first two modules cover air travel and facts such as ticket types, fare classes, overview of different airline cabin products and the best options for specific travellers. Preferred airline suppliers also take


part, including Air Canada, which gives demonstrations via virtual reality kits. Subsequent modules include: hotel booking basics with explanations of different hotel rates, bill-backs and best practice; UK and international rail ticket types; and itinerary planning. Training is not just classroom based – it includes hotel and airport visits. “Clients ask us to implement our online tool to save on costs, but then their EAs and PAs are effectively expected to become travel agents without any prior experience,” said Deadman. “This training is designed to enhance their business travel knowledge and it relates to their company’s actual travel programme, airline routes and hotels, so that they feel more confident about using BC Online to make bookings. It has been incredibly well received so far by travel bookers as it helps them make sense of the complexities of business travel.”


bluecubetravel.co.uksales@bluecubetravel.co.uk ■ 0208 948 8188


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152