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GENERATION Z


5G IS REALLY GOING TO MASSIVELY


CHANGE THE BALLGAME FOR REMOTE WORKING AND WORKING WHILE YOU’RE TRAVELLING


miss an awful lot of fascinating information about where we are on our travels; informa- tion that is multi-dimensional and ranging across many centuries and millennia.” A typical Gen Z traveller is 23-year-old


three main technological developments to appeal to Generation Z in the next 15 years: augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) – a study by Goldman Sachs puts the global market for these two technologies at US$95 billion by 2025: 5G and driverless cars. The latter two excite Spencer the most. “5G is really going to massively change the ballgame for remote working and working while you’re travelling,” says Spencer. “Rather than having a big mast covering a large area, with 5G there’ll be lots of little masts, covering a big circular area, so you’ll be able to target a route or a main train line and you open up a whole world of opportuni- ties for travelling on the go reliably and being able to take video calls on the train. “And driverless cars are going to be really interesting in the next 15 years,” he adds. “I joined Click Travel from the automotive industry and there’s a very real risk to train companies for business travel because if driverless cars come along, the conven- ience of door-to-door travel with a car connected to the internet and you can work on the way is huge.” Meanwhile, Bellini claims that AR and VR will become part of the travel experience in the future, enabling travellers “to access extremely rich visual and factual data of where they are or where they are going to”. “At the moment the typical


travel experience is rarely more than old-fashioned sightseeing,” he says. “We


68 MAY/JUNE 2019


Nazneen Jassat, a customer success manager for UNiDAYS, which is the world’s leading Student Affinity Network. It connects brands to more than 10 million Gen Z students around the world. Jassat is a regular business traveller – mainly going to European cities, such as Amsterdam, on a weekly basis and her TMC is Blue Cube Travel. Does she feel that she, as Gen Z, needs to be treated in a particular way? “I don’t feel that I need to be treated differ- ently from other generations of business trav- eller,” says Jassat. “My generation in general is tolerant and accepting – I certainly am – and don’t expect any special treatment. I do, however, feel that value goes a long way, so if a brand recognises me as a repeat customer or offers me an incentive to travel with them, I’m more likely to be loyal to that brand.”


CONNECTIVITY IS KEY However, in the near future it’s better connectivity that Jassat craves and is looking forward to 5G. “5G is potentially very exciting,” Jassat enthuses. “For example, when I am travelling on business, I often download podcasts and playlists before the trip to listen to while I’m on the train, as the wifi can be sporadic. In future, if I am running late for a trip, 5G will make it much quicker for me to download podcasts before I set off. Gen Z is known to be mobile-first, so 5G will be a game changer!” Spencer points out that Gen Z are going to drive change as they embrace emerging technologies much more than previous gen- erations. “Rather than coming at those tech- nologies with apprehension or uncertainty, they’ll come at it from a point of view of this being cool and exciting,” he says. “There’s a social currency to using the tech first and getting their first.” He emphasises that the travel companies – and hotels – that don’t integrate the best software and user experiences will “miss out on Generation Z”.


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