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PROJECT / THE RANDOLPH SCULPTURE GALLERY, OXFORD, UK


scaffolding, while enabling objects to be accurately spotlit. With its 6m high ceilings and beautiful alcoves, the Randolph Gallery makes a strik- ing backdrop for functions and the gallery is often used for conferences and wedding receptions. The flexibility to accommodate the various functions and the ability to re-aim lighting was therefore crucial, as was ensuring that the control interface was user-friendly so that staff could fully realise the benefits of the lighting. High-level windows to the south of the gallery provide daylight, while to the north, imitation windows refurbished with a glass laminate give an opal effect. Linear LED lighting (by KKDC) positioned behind this glass provides backlit illumination, thereby giving the impression of daylight. The LED lighting concealed within the imita- tion windows, along with linear LED lighting to the real windows, offers RGB coloured light. This provides a contemporary white light during the day and gives the ability to add a ‘splash’ of colour for evening events. The controls system, by Mode Lighting, pro- vides day-to-day lighting controlled via an astronomical time clock to ensure lighting is always in the correct scene. An additional keypad allows for manual override for spe- cial events. The keypad includes the ability to choose a number of preselected scenes and colours for lighting to the high-level


windows.


The events team at the Ashmolean were delighted with the lighting and its ability to give them more control over their environ- ment. Ben Acton went onto explain that, “Since the gallery has re-opened it has been great to see the staff fully use the functions the new lighting and controls can offer. For evening events, they are keen to use colour- ed light when appropriate, and utilise the flexibility of the remote controlled lights to maximise impact, from spotlighting dining tables to highlighting guest speakers.” The success of the project was due to differing factors, some of which Acton went on to hightlight. “We worked closely with Rick Mather Architects and the Ashmolean to ensure the creation of an impressive and flexible space. Collaboration was essential to understand how the museum worked and what was important to the gallery on a daily basis.” The collaboration was also greatly assisted by the fact that Hoare Lea’s Oxford office was only a ten minute walk from the Ashmolean. “The respect for the building shared by all the team was certainly a factor in the success of the project,” con- cluded Acton, “I think we all felt privileged to be given the opportunity to work within such a space.’ Professor Christopher Brown, CBE, Director of the Ashmolean was more than impressed


Far left The painted alcoves create an evocative setting for the sculpture, the high level windows are backlit by LED lighting from KKDC. Top and middle A control system from Mode Lighting enables the lighting scheme to be adapted when the gallery plays host to events. Above left Some of the impressive sculpture on display in the gallery. Above right The gallery now forms part of the Ashmolean’s Ancient World floor.


by the outcome of the project: “The Ashmolean is delighted with the lighting scheme, the space shows the Ashmolean’s world renowned Arundel Marbles, which are now displayed in a gallery which is beauti- fully integrated into the Ashmolean’s new Ancient World floor.” www.hoarelealighting.com


PROJECT DETAILS


The Randolph Sculpture Gallery, Oxford, UK Client: The Ashmolean Museum Architect: Rick Mather Architects Lighting Design: Hoare Lea Lighting


LIGHTING SPECIFIED


Mike Stoane Lighting Type X Track mounted LED spots Remote Controlled Lighting DR2 Track mounted LED spots KKDC Linear LED lighting Mode Lighting Control system


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