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150 TECHNOLOGY / ANNUAL LED ROUND UP Figure 20: Cree’s new $99 XSPR Street light


Figure 21: The driverless Beacon Minor track light from Havells


of their LED luminaires without sacrificing light output, efficacy or reliability. The new XQ-E LEDs have a tiny 1.6mm x 1.6mm foot- print and the XQ-E White LED is available in 2700K to 6200K CCTs with minimum CRI options of 70 and 80. The XQ-E White LED delivers up to 287 lumens at 3W or 1A max drive current, 85°C and the XQ-E Colour LEDs are available in red, green and blue. The package offers thermal resistances as low as 6C/W enabling excellent system ther- mal performance in application. Havells Sylvania: launches the Beacon Minor which is the first mains voltage LED spotlight available on the market which means the luminaire does not require a separate LED driver to operate. The lumi- naire simply consists of the housing, arm attachment and track adaptor; there is no need for gear or a gear box. Without the hindrance of an external drive, the Beacon Minor can have a direct connection to line voltage of 200-240V making the installation process smoother and easier. (Fig 21) Intematix: announces a range of patents covering its green and yellow GAL phosphor products and certain LuAG phosphors have been issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Intematix GAL phos- phors enable exceptional performance for LED lighting compared to other options in these colour ranges. GAL phosphors’ light emission characteristics result in higher CRI in LED lighting applications. When combined with red nitride or other red phosphors, ar- rangements also covered by these patents, CRIs up to 98 (out of 100) have been demon- strated. LEDzWorld: launched its Controlled Thermo Regulation (CTR) technology in its premium MR16 lamps. The CTR functionality imple- mented in Ledzworld’s Chameleon driver design provides an intelligent temperature control monitoring system. The tempera- ture control system acts as a watchdog and continuously measures the ambient tem- perature inside the driver compartment by


utilising a built-in thermal sensor embedded into the Chameleon driver chipset. Osram: researchers at Osram Opto Semicon- ductors demonstrated the physical effect responsible for the decrease in efficiency (droop) at typical operating current densi- ties. In LEDs based on the indium gallium ni- tride (InGaN) material system, the ‘bipolar Auger effect’ reduces the efficiency with which charge carriers are converted into light. This research provides semiconductor experts in academic institutes and in in- dustry with a plausible roadmap for finding ways to suppress this effect. ‘Droop’ is the name given to the drop in luminous efficacy (efficiency) of an LED at current densities above a few amps per square centimeter, particularly at a typical operating current of 350 milliamps (mA) for a 1mm² chip. Up to now, this effect could be measured, but none of the various hypotheses could be definitively proved by experiment. Drawing on its many years of technological know-how, Osram Opto Semi- conductors conducted a specially designed experiment to show that the bipolar Auger effect is a major contributor to droop. The results of the experiment have been published in the ‘Applied Physics Letters’ journal.


OCTOBER 2013 Cree: Cree introduces a higher-performance XLamp XP-G2 LED, boasting a seven-per- cent increase in brightness compared to the already industry-leading XP-G2 family. The new XP-G2 LEDs now delivers up to 142 lumens per watt at 350mA, 85°C or 155 lumens per watt at 350mA, 25°C in warm white (3000K,, enabling lighting manufac- turers to use fewer LEDs to achieve the same brightness at a lower system cost or increase performance levels using the same LED count and power. The new LEDs offer up to 488 lumens at 4.7W with a maximum forward current of 1.5A and a thermal resis- tance of only 4C/W.


Cree also introduces two new XLamp LED Arrays in October enabling high-lumen ap- plications. The CXA3590 LED Array delivers up to 16,225 lumens at 85°C, 68 percent more lumens compared to Cree’s previous brightest array. The CXA3590 LED Array is the ideal light source to replace 250-watt metal-halide fixtures — using 40-percent less power and designed to last twice as long. Cree also introduced the CXA3070 LED Array, which delivers more than 11,000 lu- mens at 85°C and shares the same footprint and package design as the existing CXA3050 LED. Both the CXA3590 and CXA3070 arrays are optimised to simplify design and enable low system cost. Binning is available in ANSI White, 2- and 4-Step ellipses. Philips: launches the Fortimo LED Down- light module (DLM) Gen 5 delivers increased system efficacy, including driver, of up to 110lm/W. In addition, the downlight portfo- lio is expanded with a 5000 lumen module ideal for high ceiling applications such as shopping malls, airports, and train stations. The 5000 lumen module as well as the 2000 and 3000 lumen modules, has the Philips Lumileds LUXEON M LEDs inside, creating the required higher lumen packages in the same form factor. The LUXEON M is a thin film flip chip delivering high efficacy and high flux density from a uniform source with tight correlated colour temperature control Philips: launches the CertaFlux DL-S, a brand new LED downlight module. This integrated LED light engine fulfills the basic market needs for making simple LED downlights. Compared to other modules, the integrated heat sink and driver of the CertaFlux DL-S make it easy for luminaire manufacturers to design the module into new luminaires, or to upgrade existing ones to LED enabling fast market introduction The CertaFlux DL-S offers basic product performance and functionality. There are products available in 1000 and 2000 lumen with respective energy consumption of 13W and 26W (> 74Lm/W). The LED modules have a colour rendering index (CRI) of > 80 and offer a product lifetime of up to 25,000 hours. (Fig 22) Seoul Semiconductor: sells the Acrich2 AC LED Modules in Kit Form enabling design- ers to develop customised form factors. The kits consist of high-voltage Acrich Multi-Junction Technology (MJT) LEDs along with the Acrich Integrated Circuit (AIC) power controller device. Designers now have maximum flexibility in designing AC LED modules for their unique AC based fixture needs. (Fig 23a & b) Tridonic: launches the TALEXXengine STARK NEW DLE for LED downlights. The system, consisting of an LED module and LED con-


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