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118 TECHNOLOGY / PLDC, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK


POINT OF NO RETURN PLDC 2013 saw a record number of professional lighting attendees at the Bella Center in Copenhagen.


The fourth Professional Lighting Design Convention 2013 in Copenhagen again showed a remarkable development in the process to recognise the lighting design profession. Approximately 1,500 attendees representing more than 60 countries gathered in the Danish capital for the event, the numbers marking a growth of ten per cent on PLDC in Madrid in 2011. Altogether 24 Partner Associations, 34 Partner Universities / Institutes and 18 partners from the media were involved. The 60 partners from the international lighting industry created the largest ‘exhibition’ dedicated to architectural lighting in Scandinavia.


“The exhibition space was completely sold out to the last square metre. We were overwhelmed by the support of all our partners”, says Joachim Ritter, initiator and owner of the event, and Chair of the PLDC Steering Committee.


Acknowledgement of the significance of PLDC was also visible through the keynotes presented. The Danish Minister for Climate, Environment and Building, Martin Lidegaard, was present as well as leading architects such as Kai-Uwe Bergmann


from BIG, New York office; Taghrid Alina Al Smairat from Sahel Al Hiyari Architects in Jordan and daylight specialist and architect James Carpenter from James Carpenter Design Associates, USA. Light artist Mischa Kuball and visual effects designer Alessandro Gobbetti also gave inspirational papers about lighting in their field, proving that designed lighting is increasingly in evidence including in fields outside the purely architectural.


Five excursions were offered to key projects in Copenhagen and Malmö, and interactive conferencing was implemented, reflecting the new generation entering the market. A lighting lab on gallery lighting provided attendees with the opportunity to experience and experiment with innovative techniques for illuminating oil paintings, and a PLD community lounge gave all present the opportunity to meet, discuss and exchange ideas.


The excursions were fully booked very quickly and further excursions had to be organised to cope with the interest. They included: - The new Blue Planet Aquarium (3XN Architects) and Royal Playhouse (Lundgaard


and Tranberg) guided tour by the lighting designer Jesper Kongshaug.


- Several guided tours of three underground stations in Malmö during which Johan Moritz from Malmö Kommun showed the work of Lichtlabor Bartenbach and Black Ljusdesign. - “Industriens Hus” (Confederation of Danish Industry building with Martin Professional, Design: Kollision).


Interactive / collaborative conferencing is a new idea and was tested for the first time. In our everyday lives, social media can be time-consuming, disruptive and downright annoying. When applied purposefully, however, to gather and compare opinions, social media can be attractive, helpful and engaging. All attendees were invited to contribute, comment and interact through the available social media networks, starting a few days before PLDC. Using LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and the PLDC app! All interaction was monitored on the “Post !t” – social media monitors. At the conference Koert Vermeulen of ACT presented a paper on the status quo of the lighting profession and dared to predict a forecast of the developments over the


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