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PROJECT / DALLAS CITY PERFORMANCE HALL, TEXAS, USA


All photography: Nick Merrick Hedrich Blessing and the Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs


Above The exterior of the Dallas City Performance Hall.


Far Left Between the lobby and the auditorium two light wells allow daylight into the auditorium, while LED RGB fixtures at the bottom of the wells add colour. Left The innovative LED curtain in the auditorium offers a modern take on the Victorian era backcloth, while dimmable halogen wall-grazers add warmth to the room.


tomisation in the appearance of the room, while the main lobby includes mounting locations and power for theatrical lighting, to support special events in this space. In lieu of a traditional grand curtain, the stage has instead a unique LED mesh curtain with a black traveler behind. Schuler Shook and SOM envisioned this as a canvas for commissioned art and a palette for elec- tronic creativity. The curtain is comprised of LED colour changing nodes that are locat- ed on 8” centres and controlled through an ETC Mosaic system.


The first artist to be commissioned to pro- duce work for the curtain was Shane Pen- nington, his piece comprising a fifteen min- ute video loop showing digitalised figures walking in and out of shot. The figures were created from the film Pennington made of passersbys in Berlin’s Alexanderplatz. Theatrical, dimmed lighting circuits and a lighting control network are distribut- ed throughout the auditorium and stage. Additional non-dim, 60A, three-phase


outlets and show power disconnects have been placed in the catwalks, balcony rail, gridiron, pit, and around the stage. Relay-controlled switched receptacles allow remote on/off control for constant power devices such as moving lights, accessories, and LED fixtures. ETC Eos and Ion consoles have been provided for theatrical lighting control, with large Paradigm touch screens available for architectural control and preset recall.


The stage also includes a cue light system by GDS and stage edge marker lights. The lighting system is designed to handle the extremely wide range of production types, and also to easily accommodate future technologies.


The environmental credentials of the hall were also important, the design being cre- ated with the submission of the structure for LEED certification, with a goal of LEED Silver, very much in mind. www.schulershook.com


PROJECT DETAILS


Dallas City Performance Hall, Dallas, Texas, USA Client: The City of Dallas


Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Corgan Associates. Lighting Design: Schuler Shook


LIGHTING SPECIFIED


Kurt Versen - Halogen T4, 0°-30° sloped ceiling downlight Kurt Versen - Incandescent, A-lamp downlight Color Kinetics - LED adjustable uplight fixture Times Square - Halogen PAR38 borderstrip uplight Kurt Versen - Ceramic metal halide PAR30 adjustable accent Color Kinetics - LED coluor-changing floodlight E.T.C - Halogen ellipsoidal projector


Corelite - Linear fluorescent T5HO asymmetric cove light Lutron - 100%-1% electronic dimming ballast Color Kinetics - LED RGB marker light WE-EF - Ceramic metal halide T6 cylinder downlight Bartco - Linear fluorescent T5 staggered strip Energie - Linear fluorescent T8 striplight pendant Focal Point - Linear fluorescent T5 continuous slot Bega - Compact fluorescent steplight IO - LED lightbar


Cole - Incandescent A-lamp striplight Columbia - Linear fluorescent T8 striplight Phoenix - Ceramic metal halide docklight Lithona - Metal halide ED17 full-cutoff area light Winona - Ceramic metal halide PAR30 cylinder uplight


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