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152 TECHNOLOGY / ANNUAL LED ROUND UP


Figure 22 - Philips CertaFlux DL-S all-in-one module


verter is 81 percent more efficient - from 77lm/W before up to 140lm/W now. At the same time, state-of-the-art LED technology has improved costs and reduced the height to 20 mm. (Fig 24)


NOVEMBER 2013 Intematix: unveils a remote phosphor-based LED lighting module with 203 lumens per watt efficacy. It is believed that this module represents the highest level of efficacy among LED-based light sources commercial- ly available for production in the market today. The LED lighting module uses a commercially available, 26mm diameter dome shaped remote phosphor developed by Intematix that converts blue light to on- the-black-body-line 6000K daylight spec- trum and 70CRI with conversion efficacy of 267 lumens per radiant watt. The design is applicable for round and linear module configurations and is offered in colour temperatures ranging from 2700K to 6000K with CRI values from 70 up to 98. This ground breaking lighting module uses Philips Lumileds LUXEON T/TX family of royal blue LEDs, achieving industry leading wall plug efficiencies of 76%. (Fig 25) Philips: Fortimo LED high brightness module (HBMt) is a compact rectangular light en- gine with non-integrated driver to allow for creation of different light distributions using a metal reflector, similar to HID lamps. The design in is further simplified because the same form factor offers multiple lumen packages, leveraging a single design into a full portfolio to better meet end user needs. The Fortimo LED HBMt Gen3 LED ‘lamp’ offers high lumen output from a small surface and has an improved module efficiency of up to 137lm/W. Its fixed light emitting area, lumen package and me- chanical interface are Zhaga certified. The module is available in three lumen packages (2500, 4000 and 6000) and in two colour temperatures: 4000K and 5700 K. With the introduction of Fortimo LED HBMt Gen3 the 4000 and 6000 lumen modules are available


Figure 23 – Seoul Semiconductors Acrich Driver IC (a) and Module (b)


in CRI 70 or CRI 80. Tridonic: launches the TALEXXengine STARK SLE for white light quality in all tones and is suitable for a wide range of applications. The new FOOD modules in state-of-the-art LED technology are available in four differ- ent colour versions: • Gold – brilliant warm light with a CRI


> 90. The light makes bakery goods appear really fresh and brings out the best in jew- ellery. • Gold+ – brilliant light with a slight


brown tinge. This makes crusty bakery items such as baguettes and croissants look as though they have come straight out of the oven. • Fresh Meat – a slightly red light for the


delicatessen counter. This emphasises the red tones in fresh and cooked meats with- out colouring the white streaks. Fresh and cooked meats look really appetising. • Meat+ – saturated red tones to make


all fresh and cooked meats look attractive and tasty. This light gives all the streaks in fresh meat a red appearance. Verbatim: launched its ground-breaking Natural Vision VxRGB™ technology, avail- able as realistic candle (Classic B) and MR16 retrofit LED lamps. True Candlelight LED lamps allow users to experience the warmth and ambience of candlelight. Delivering 1900K colour temperature, the white light spectrum and intensity of the LED closely matches a real candle flame – a feature not possible with traditional LED or incandes- cent lamps and something that has inspired this product to be positioned as ‘Natural Vision’. Ideal for use in decorative lighting fixtures such as chandeliers, wall sconces and table settings, the 2.5W VxRGB candle LED has an E14 base fitting and optics that feature a flame tip design. (Fig 26a & b)


DECEMBER 2013 Intematix: announces the commercial availability of ChromaLit Linear, a remote phosphor offering uniform luminance over any length, high flux density and a sleek,


white off-state finish to replace the esti- mated 5.7 billion units of installed linear fixtures worldwide. The ChromaLit Linear product delivers naturally uniform, high quality light with conversion efficacy of up to 215 lumens per radiant watt or up to 163 lumens per system watt when used with the most efficient blue LEDs available. The ChromaLit Linear remote phosphor solution offers flexibility of length. Surface lumen density scales from 500 to 2000 lumens per linear foot and the system offers 3 SDCM colour consistency as standard and colour temperature options from 3000K to 5000K and CRI of 80. LEDzWorld: launches three additional high-quality LED lamps. These are sched- uled to include a GaN-on-GaN MR16 GU5.3 (8W, 420 lumen, 20 BA), a VxRGB MR16 GU5.3, and finally a MR11 (4W, 210 Lumen, 20BA). Sharp: introduces a new mid-power, SMD Tuneable White LED in a similar vein to the Tiger COB LED array. The new devices will be ideal for colour tuneable LED panels and T5 equivalents. Soraa: launches the first line of high colour rendering GaN on GaN™ LED MR16 GU10 230V mains voltage lamps which are com- patible with a very wide range of dimmers. The MR16’s novel heatsink design and ther- mal management system make the lamps suitable for use in enclosed fixtures, damp locations and outdoor applications.


FINAL OBSERVATIONS FROM THE INDUSTRY:


Figure 24: The TALEXXengine STARK NEW DLE


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