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154 TECHNOLOGY / ANNUAL LED ROUND UP


Wavelength (nm)


Figure 25: A record 203 lm/W remote phosphor lamp from Intematix


WHAT TO EXPECT IN 2014 Paul Scheidt, Product Marketing Manager, Cree, LED Components believes: “2014 should be a sea of change in the way LED suppliers approach the lighting market. Focus is expected to shift away from the technology metrics for individual LEDs toward the intelligent use of LEDs in a system context. LED prices should continue to decline, so the parts of the system that are not LEDs become much more important to continue to drive down system cost. LED innovation is likely to happen much more in harmony with driver, optical and thermal system innovation.”


The team at LEDzWorld states: “The potential ahead of LED lighting to deliver real and measurable advantages - to save energy, last years longer, significantly lower bottom-line costs - is limitless. We’ve all seen the projections of massive growth within the global LED marketplace. A recent report from the US Department of Energy states ‘LED lighting is expected to repre- sent 36 percent of lumen-hour sales on the general illumination market by 2020, and 74 percent by 2030.’ But for it to be the next great defining feature of the lighting land- scape, LED lighting needs to work. We believe the number one obstacle to widespread adoption for LEDs is compat- ibility. Today, legacy infrastructure - the transformers, fixtures, and control devices already incorporated into built environ- ments - create unique and challenging compatibility interferences. What we’ve seen to date in our current, ongoing preliminary phase of LED adoption is ‘plug and play’ applications - a customer simply installs an LED bulb into an exist- ing fixture. Sometimes that fixture works with the LED bulb’s mechanical, electric, and thermal requirements; sometimes it doesn’t; and sometimes there are mixed results. So that a few bad actors don’t spoil LEDs


Figure 26: Verbatim 5W VxRGB candle LED (a) and spectrum (b)


reputation, it’s time for the entire LED industry to tackle compatibility, together.”


Mike Krames, Chief Technology Officer of Soraa. “In 2013, we saw that a fundamentally superior materials technology (GaN-on-GaN) could lead to products with fundamentally better characteristics. In the case of MR16 lamps, these include highest ever light output (65W+ equivalency) with uncom- promising color rendering, single beam performance, truly retrofit-able (sealed fixture use) and furthermore the ability to render white materials properly as per halogen and previous conventional lighting technologies. Compare this to the standard blue-based LED approach to lighting which has resulted in MR16 lamps with low output, mediocre colour rendering (with spectral blue ‘spike’), not-for-use in sealed fixtures, and no ability to render manufactured white goods properly. In addition we saw the benefits of Soraa’s vertical integration in the development of completely new ways to improve the end-user experience, through our SNAP system. For 2014, we will see significant prolifera- tion of GaN-on-GaN to new lamps and form factors, and continuing improvements in efficiency, light output, beam capability, and even more advances regarding quality of light.”


CONCLUSIONS 2013 has demonstrated important gains in the development of technologies including the use of new substrates such as GaN that can improve performance and reliability compared to the standard Sapphire and Silicon Carbide substrates found in 99% of LEDs used today. The major players are starting to leverage their technology know-how to help reduce the cost of LED fixture ownership with Cree leading the way with a 40W LED bulb for less than $10. The price down of fixtures


will only help to accelerate the rate of pen- etration of LEDs within the market. As I predicted last year, commercially avail- able LEDs did indeed exceed 180lm/W and the replacement of T5 luminaires started aggressively in the marketplace. One aspect of last year’s prediction didn’t quite execute as expected because advanced low cost colour tuneable LED products didn’t become widely available. Despite the launch of LED emitters such as the Sharp Tiger there were few, low cost, tuneable white LED fixtures in the market- place.


My predictions for 2014. • The commercial availability of 200lm/W LED emitters will be available by the end of 2014. • Low cost tuneable white LED fixtures will become widely available that offer end users the ability to set colour temperatures dynamically with a price difference of less than 25% more than static white equiva- lents. • The rise of DC Grid and centralised LED driver solutions will begin to be seen due to increased reliability, ease of installation and lower overall system costs. • The rise of Ethernet connected LED fix- tures and the use of mobile applications will become common place for end-users. Thus, 2014 will see the start of the combined LED fixture and control system to help introduce smart lighting to commercial lighting. • Wireless connectivity will become popu- lar in certain applications however reliabili- ty and security aspects will mean end-users patience will be tested. g.archenhold@mondiale.co.uk


Dr Geoff Archenhold is an active investor in LED driver and fixture manufacturers and a lighting energy consultant.


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