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144 TECHNOLOGY / ANNUAL LED ROUND UP


Figure 3: The new toLEDo retrofit tube from Sylvania


up by the company, in this case, Munich Re, as a first in their industry, backed the warranty offered by Xicato. The insurance industry’s entrance into this market signals that it’s both possible to evaluate and mea- sure the risk - or the certainty - that colour consistency can be maintained. Xicato’s warranty states that the colour will be with- in .003 duv over a five year period.


MARCH 2013 Cree: launches the first sub $10 LED light bulb in the US. The innovative bulb is illumi- nated by Cree LED Filament Tower Technol- ogy and provides a compact optically bal- anced light source within a real glass bulb to deliver consumers warm light. Boasting a shape that looks like a traditional light bulb, Cree LED bulbs can be placed in most light- ing fixtures in the home. The new Cree LED bulb is designed to last 25,000 hours or 25 times longer than typical incandescent light bulbs and has a retail price of $9.97 for the warm white 40-watt replacement, $12.97 for the 60-watt warm white replacement and $13.97 for the 60-watt day light bulb. The Cree LED light bulb (60-watt incandes- cent replacement) delivers 800 lumens and consumes only 9.5 watts and is available in warm white (2700K) and day light (5000K) colour temperatures. The Cree LED light bulb (40-watt incandescent replacement) delivers 450 lumens and consumes only 6 watts and is available in 2700K colour tem- perature. (Fig 6a & b) Cree also extends the XLamp CXA family of integrated LED arrays with the new high- er-light-output CXA2540 and CXA3050 LEDs. Optimised to simplify designs and lower sys- tem cost, the new CXA LEDs deliver 5,000 (CXA2540) to more than 10,000 lumens (CXA3050), enabling new applications such as high-output track lights and downlights, outdoor area lighting and high-bay lighting. The new Cree CXA3050 LED is now the brightest member of the CXA family and can enable LED replacements for up to 100-watt ceramic metal halide in spot lighting or up


Figure 4: Tunable White LED Tiger Zenigata COB


Figure 5: World record performance from Soraa


to 175 watt pulse-start metal halide in high- bay and outdoor area lighting. The addition of the CXA3050 LED Array also enables lighting manufacturers to rapidly expand their product portfolio with higher-lumen products. The CXA2540 and CXA3050 LED Arrays use the same proven package tech- nology as the CXA1507 LED, which now has 6,000 hours of LM-80 data published and is able to support TM-21 calculated lifetimes of greater than 130,000 hours at binning current and greater than 85,000 hours at maximum current. Cree also introduced a new product family, the XLamp XQ LEDs, including the XQ-B and the XQ-D, which feature a unique combina- tion of small size, novel light distribution and high-reliability design. The XQ LEDs are Cree’s smallest lighting-class LEDs at just 1.6mm x 1.6mm, 57 percent smaller than Cree’s XLamp XB package. In cool white (5000K,, the XQ-B LED delivers up 160 lumens-per-watt at 0.18W, and the XQ-D LED delivers up to 130 lumens-per-watt at 1W. Both LEDs are available in 2700K to 6500K colour temperatures with minimum 80 CRI option. LEDzWORLD: introduces its breakthrough MR16 GU5.3, 500 lumen lamp with Cha- meleon driver which self-adjusts to its environment by first detecting the trans- former type, then analyzing its waveform, and finally adjusting itself to make a perfect electrical fit with that particular


transformer. The Chameleon driver makes the company’s MR16 LED retrofit lamps truly ‘plug and play’ devices that can be used in a wide variety of transformer and dimmer combinations. LEDzWORLD also unveils a suite of products that featured its Universal Trailing Edge and Leading Edge Truly Linear Dimming (UTL) technology. The lamps included a GU10 (480 lumen, 7W), a PAR16 (600 lumen, 8.5W) and a PAR38 (2000 lumen, 25W). The UTL tech- nology is a breakthrough proprietary system engineered and patented by the company. It is a highly sophisticated driver that works flawlessly in combination with both trailing- and leading-edge dimmers. This high-perfor- mance driver delivers the highest possible compatibility with control systems. (Fig 7) Philips: launches the Fortimo LED Integrat- ed spot 600 lumen package which is an all in one solution that includes an integrated driver, optics and heat sink. This solution is not only easy to design in, it also provides luminaire manufacturers high quality of light and flexibility of choice. The integrated spot module is available in three differ- ent colour temperatures (2700, 3000 and 4000K, and comes with three beam angles (15, 24 and 36 degree). The Fortimo LED Integrated Spot Gen 2 dimmable module can be connected directly to the mains and is an efficient and affordable solution, ideal for the existing 50W LV halogen market. The integrated system means that no external


Figure 6 – The new Cree 60W LED bulb (a) and Filament Tower solution (b)


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