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084 PROJECT / LA CAVE, LE BON MARCHÉ, PARIS, FRANCE


Left Three zones of light were developed in order to re-create the feeling of entering a cave. KKDC linear LEDs were used in the atrium area. Above The circular nature of the space culminates in a stunning rotunda and a glass dome shaped skylight.


Le Bon Marché is a retail institution. The oldest department store in the world, it is Parisian through and through and is even comprised of a metal frame created by Mr Eiffel himself. The store has continued to bloom, despite the changing attitudes to retail, skilfully avoiding the fate of La Sa- maritaine, one of the other famed Parisian department stores, which closed in 2005, leaving its beautiful arc-deco skin to fall into disrepair on the banks of the Seine. Currently undergoing a four-year recon- struction, the Swiss company Lichtkompe- tenz was invited to contribute the lighting design to the LVMH owned structure. With its 30,000sqm of retail space and its legendary food hall La Grande Epicerie de Paris, the building sits amid the high end fashion boutiques of St. Germain, espousing a typically Parisian mixture of chaotically placed fittings amid beautifully run down retail architecture.


The four year renovation programme is en- visaged to successively renovate the build-


ing complex from cellar to roof, developing new retail, restaurant and event spaces in the process, as well as a dramatic daylight atrium space and a new connection walk way between the LBM department store and the Grand Epicerie.


In March 2012 Lichtkompetenz was invited to create a master plan for the interior and exterior of the building, concentrating on a new retail space ‘Balthazar’ destined for the store’s basement and its connection to the food hall in the basement via ‘La Cave’ a new wine cellar and restaurant. The brief was to retain the quintessential- ly Parisian flair of the traditional interior, while providing an appropriate lighting scheme, which served both setting and product. ‘La Cave’ opened just before Christmas in 2012, the 550sqm space containing 3000 carefully selected wines. The prestigious collection of wine, spirits and champagne is presented in a subdued and warm atmos- phere created mainly through furniture


integrated with a high colour rendering LED lighting design.


The bespoke manufactured shelving with integrated light was designed to illuminate every label of the bottles on display without creating glare, while a handfull of down- lights and inground uplights were used to help emphasise the elegant, distinguished look and feel of the interior.


Three zones of light were designed to offer a transition from a warm white cavernous space, through a neutral white circula- tion zone in the rotunda, to a cool white ambient feature light in the central atrium space. These cool colours were chosen in response to the impressive glass dome- shaped skylight, which will span the centre core of the building and bring daylight to the containing food market, restaurant and event space at the end of the building’s rejuvination process. A major feature of the design is the circular nature of the space, with the area climax- ing in the glass dome above the escalators.


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