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146 TECHNOLOGY / ANNUAL LED ROUND UP


Figure 10: The LuxiTune from LEDEngin


Figure 11: The Osram Ostar LED


Figure 12: The new coloured Duris P5 from Osram


white light, similar to other modules in the product family. Depending on the lumi- naire design, the Fortimo LED LLM 6000 lm module may be used on the 4500lm Gen2 heat sink, simplifying and accelerating the design-in process. The system is developed for use with the Fortimo 6pin-to-wire cable and the Xitanium 150W 1.05A Prog+ GL-F sXt driver. The Constant Light Output (CLO) feature can be programmed into the driver to ensure 100% lumen maintenance at end of life. Soraa: announces its new perfect spectrum Soraa Vivid 2 and Premium 2 LED MR16 lamp lines—the first ultra-efficient replacements for 65-watt and 75-watt halogen lamps, available for both 12V and mains voltages. A technological breakthrough made possible by Soraa’s recently announced world-record performance gallium-nitride on gallium-ni- tride (GaN on GaN) LEDs, the new Soraa LED MR16 lamps deliver the industry’s highest light output, while rendering vivid colours, richer reds and whiter whites, transforming ordinary lighting in any space into extraordi- narily vibrant, brilliant and energy efficient lighting. The Soraa Vivid 2 and Premium 2 lamps’ GaN on GaN LED technology leverages the 1000x lower crystal defect density advan- tage of the native substrate, thus emit- ting substantially more light and allowing reliable operation at much higher tempera- tures. This enables a very simple and robust MR16 lamp design that uses a single LED light source and a simple heatsink, while producing 65W to 75W halogen equivalent light output and operating reliably at lamp temperatures of up to 120°C, a requirement for use in the most constrained fixtures. The Soraa Vivid 2 LED MR16 lamp has a CRI of 95 and R9 of 95 and is available in a complete suite of beam angles, colour tem- peratures and lumen outputs; and the Soraa Premium 2 LED MR16 lamp has a CRI of 80 and is available in multiple beam angles and colour temperatures. (Fig 13)


MAY 2013 Cree: Cree introduces the XLamp XP-E2 colour LEDs, built on Cree’s revolution- ary SC³ Technology™ next-generation LED platform. The XP-E2 colour LEDs deliver up to 88 percent higher maximum light output compared to alternative high-power colour LEDs, enabling lighting manufactur- ers to more cost-effectively address a wide spectrum of applications, such as archi- tectural, vehicle and display lighting. The XP-E2 colour LEDs deliver higher lumens per watt and lumens per dollar compared to the original XP-E colour LEDs. With a forward voltage of 2.9V at 350mA the white XP-E2 can be driven up to 1A and deliver 283 lumens in a compact 3.45mm x 3.45mm package. (Fig 14) Verbatim: announces the commercial release of Vivid Vision, a directional LED lamp using VxRGB technology developed by Verbatim’s parent company, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation. Vivid Vision ensures that colours and fine details of objects are rendered accurately through a unique com- bination of red, green and blue phosphors applied to a violet, rather than blue, LED die. The VxRGB LED is a lamp replacement for typically 20W low voltage halogen reflector lamps. Rated at 6.5W (equivalent to 20W incandescent lamps), it produces


180 lumens output over a 35° beam angle, with a colour temperature of 2900K and a CRI of 85.


JUNE 2013 GE: launches the next generation Infusion LED modules offering significant wattage reductions and improved levels of efficacy. The interchangeable module range includes M1000, M1500, M2000 and M3000 versions, providing an ideal LED lighting solution for retail, hospitality and office environments. The range offers lumen packages, from 850 to 4,500 lumens, to meet a wide variety of lighting needs whilst delivering high colour rendering, with CRI ranges to Ra > 90. (Fig 15) Havells Sylvania: launches the RefLED Coolfit MR16 which packs an impressive 575 lumens into a small size, to achieve a per- formance that makes it the first LED true direct replacement for 50W MR16 halogen lamps. Incorporating Sylvania’s Coolfit Au- tomatic Heat Control Technology, the MR16 575lm is suitable for all types of residential and commercial downlight applications including enclosed fire-rated and IP65 fix- tures. (Fig 16) LEDEngin: claims to achieve the highest colour rendering in the world’s smallest LED emitter for high-end directional lighting. The company’s Gallery White solution uses


Figure 13: The Soraa Vivid 2 MR16


Figure 14: The new Cree XP-E colour LED footprint


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