This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PROJECT / THE RANDOLPH SCULPTURE GALLERY, OXFORD, UK


095


Pictures: Redshift Photography HONOURING THE STATUE


The Randolph Sculpture Gallery missed out on the splendid rejuvenation process that brought a new lease of life to the Ashmolean Museum in 2009. A design by Hoare Lea Lighting helped the gallery to level the field.


Situated on the ground floor, next to the grand entrance of the original 1845 Grade I listed Cockerell Building at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, the Randolph Sculpture Gallery houses the Arundel Collection. The collection of Greek and Roman sculptures and inscriptions, collated in the 17th cen- tury by Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel, is the earliest collection of its kind in Britain. The Randolph Gallery has long been used for the display of Classical sculpture, its proportions and architecture making it a perfect setting. However, the Gallery had never benefitted from modern exhibition lighting and, as one of the original galleries not incorporated in the 2009 redevelopment scheme of the Ashmolean, its appearance was in contrast to the new galleries beyond. The project, which completed the refur- bishment of the Ashmolean’s ground floor, was undertaken by Rick Mather Architects.


It comprised relighting, redecoration, and the refinishing of the original Portland stone floor, together with a return to Cockerell’s original colour scheme, in order to bring the gallery back to its original state. Integrating the lighting in a way that was sympathetic to the Grade I listed building was important when working in such a historic setting, so illuminating the display objects, while causing minimal visual impact to the space, was vital. A lighting design from Hoare Lea Lighting was created to ensure these aims were met. The Hoare Lea scheme involved using track-mounted LED spotlights, including the Type X by Mike Stoane Lighting and the DR2 by Remote Controlled Lighting, using track which coordinates with decorative ceiling cornice straps to minimise impact. Special brackets developed for remote control lighting ensure close coordination with the


Above The Randolph Sculpture gallery in its newly striking glory. Track mounted LED spotlights from Mike Stoane Lighting and Remote Controlled Lighting helped to highlight one of England’s finest sculpture collections.


cornice straps and the track system, allow- ing for a neat and minimal installation. “One of the key elements of the design was ensuring the cabling and lighting could be installed with minimal impact on the structure and finishes of the Gallery,” com- mented Ben Acton, senior lighting designer at Hoare Lea Lighting, “and that once installed they would not detract from the original, intricate architectural features.” To ensure this was not an issue Hoare Lea worked closely with the gallery’s conserva- tion team.


One of the virtues of the DR2 spotlight is that it can be controlled via a remote device, eliminating the need for


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182