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098 VENUE


KINGDOM OF DREAMS


DELHI, INDIA ASIA/PACIFIC/OCEANIA


The Kingdom of Dreams is arguable one of India’s most prestigious entertainment projects to date. It is located at the apex of the golden triangle of Jaipur, Agra and Delhi. The complex is the brainchild of Gagan Sharma and Viraf Sarkari - who formed the Great Indian Nautanki Company (GINC) - and together they have produced a truly magical place using Indian art, crafts, heritage, culture, cuisine and performing art influences to create the ultimate leisure experience. Initially the idea was to build a large auditorium, but the plan quickly evolved to encompass three individual venues - Nautanki Mahal (theatre), Culture Gully (boulevard) and IIFA Buzz Bar and Lounge - which together make up the Kingdom of Dreams. Shortly after opening the theatre and entertainment filled boulevard, the Show- Shaa Theatre took the total count up to four sections. And another 250-seat theatre is set to join the line up in the very near future. The Kingdom of Dreams concept was conceived in 2002 and it was deemed to be the first of its kind. Its aim was to attract tourists and locals alike, tempting them with all the glitz and glamour of Bolly- wood, as well as facilities for live performance, plays, and corporate events. To make this dream a reality Gagan and Viraf knew they required a team of experts to design and install a sound solution that was capable of fulfilling the high expectations.


www.mondodr.com


Gagan and Viraf appointed Sunny Sarid - who was well-known in the leisure and entertainment world for his DJ’ing and input into recent audio installation projects - as Audio & Project Consultant. Sunny said: “The promoters of GINC, Viraf and Gagan, had a clear idea of what they wanted in the main auditorium. The sound had to be loud and full but comfortable to listen to in a theatre environment with a good low end. I was given a free reign to work on the project which is a once in a lifetime opportunity.” Sunny was approached by Harman distributor, Hi-Tech Audio Sys- tems Pvt Ltd, based in Delhi. Director, Rajan Gupta, said: “We got in touch with Sunny and gave a presentation on what we could do, to show the capabilities Hi-Tech has for this kind of project. Initially we got the go ahead for the Culture Gully and the main auditorium nearly went to someone else, but we kept on knocking and knocking and knocking, saying ‘guys we are here, we can deliver’. We have the largest inventory in India and we have good spares, and at the end of the day you need good products and good spares.” After winning the contract for the Nautanki Mahal theatre - and later the smaller ShowShaa Theatre - Rajan and his team, headed by Technical Director Manik Gupta, set to work on the Harman package. Rajan said: “The expectations for this project were extremely high, including full service back up in the event of any product failure. A key reason that Harman was chosen was due to the product quality. As a company with a rich experience in audio installations in India, Hi-Tech is proud to have been a part of this dream project, providing


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