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046 REPORT


ADDICTIVE TV | GRAHAM DANIELS


We’re often called visual DJs, but we always prefer the term audiovisual artists - a much better sounding description. In short, Addictive TV create visual music built from sampling audio you can ‘see’ - the film-making term is ‘diegetic sound’, sounds that you can see the source of, such as slamming doors, someone clapping and so on. The upshot is we always need screens and projectors for our live shows, and 2011 was a good year for playing a very diverse range of venues and events in different and interesting parts of the world - including post-revolution Tunisia and Egypt. In Brazil, we had the capital’s National Museum as our backdrop with a 60 metre image, and in France used one of Airscreen’s big 16 metre inflatable cinema screens at Cabaret Frappé’s record breaking largest ever silent disco - they had 10,000 headphones can you believe. We actually played twice this year in Brazil and both had great visual set-ups - in fact every time we’ve played there it’s always been a great set-up. Brazil trip number one was the big Fest ‘11 film and music event in Paulínia (often nicknamed ‘Paulíwood’ as it’s the centre of Brazil’s film industry) who had three enormous screens, the central one on-stage being a 10 metre wide Lighthouse LED display which carried live cameras for all the other acts - from Tropicalia hero Gilberto Gil to Brazilian superstar Seu Jorge, but for us, we sent the screen our show output and lit-up the whole tent, audio / visually remixing films and artists like Seu Jorge - cheekily turning one of his ballads into a drum ‘n’ bass track. As an aside, audio and video sync is extremely important to us in our live shows and we’ve often found LED screens can sometimes add a few frames of delay to the video, so we usually compensate by delaying the audio by, say, 125 milliseconds, so by the time our im- ages are on screen they’re back in sync with the audio. Our second Brazil trip of 2011, in September, was for the Celebrar Brasília event in the capital Brasília, where the technical team from our old friends the Sao Paulo VJ group Visualfarm, had rigged an eight metre lycra screen and were rear projecting with a Sanyo PLC-XF47 15k projector but were also projecting on the enormous white Dome of Brazil’s National Museum. Alexis Anastasiou, the group’s founder, explains: “This event is a great open air party for around ten thousand people and it’s the third year we’ve set-up an installation on this building and so the rig wasn’t too hard. On the dome, we used three pairs of stacked 15k projectors, with a coolux Pandoras Box Media Server forming one seamless 60 metre wide image. We also performed our visuals before and after Addictive TV, and that building


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painted by such a huge image is quite a sight to behold and a playground for any video artist.” A brand new piece of technology we came across in 2011 was the NEC U310W,


not a projector we would normally use but a great little beamer which worked perfectly in the filming of Channel 5’s The Gadget Show we were part of. We ap- peared in episode one of the new season, creating an audiovisual mix for one of the presenters testing the filming capabilities of the iPhone, he performed our AV mix on the programme using the NEC and it’s ultra short throw, and I mean ultra short. Using a reflection to project, it sat a couple of feet in front of a three metres wide screen and filled it perfectly. Looking online afterwards I read that this newly-devel- oped aspheric mirror technology achieves the shortest throw distance of any front projector ever. One of the coolest things I saw though in 2011 was at a gig we did in France where a technician had an app on his phone that completely controlled the projector, I knew some of them had WiFi capability, but I hadn’t seen an app that replaced the remote, very handy indeed. So, with another year of Fastfolds, LEDs and a multitude of projectors behind us, we’re seeing the year out and 2012 in (which will have happened by the time you read this) playing in Shanghai, China, for Gatecrasher’s New Year’s Eve event. It’s for 10,000 people at the Shanghai International Exhibition Centre and from stage plans and layouts I’ve seen, they’re having a massive visual set-up with a 40 metre stage and 10 enormous screens all the way round the cavernous room, each with its own Sanyo PLC-XF47 15k projector - which do seem to be the choice of projector at so many events. Midnight is in the middle of our set, so we’re creating a special countdown made of news feeds from around the world, should be a rocking night. So what will 2012 bring? Well, over the years we’ve performed on all sorts of


screens and surfaces, in both small and large venues, to amazing spaces like the BFI Imax Cinema or the enormous fly-tower of the National Theatre in London, to even Europe’s largest LED screen at the T-Mobile Forum in Bonn, Germany, so perhaps in 2012 we’ll try the visual equivalent of a silent disco, and have no screens at all but use those Zetronix video-glasses and ‘project’ right in front of people’s eyes. www.addictive.tv


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