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VENUE 093


The main bar at Avalon


performance. Upstairs is reserved for VIPs. On the upper level, Avalon club members can enjoy an unobstructed view of the club’s stage where many international artists and DJs perform. Operator of Avalon Singapore, Steve Adelman, explained the huge task building Avalon created: “The Singapore project was very unique and challenging given the structure that houses it, a floating glass structure in Marina Bay. From layout, to finishes, to acoustics, we had to look at everything over and over to make sure we were coming up with optimal solutions.” Designers, Roman and Williams, were tasked with transforming the 17,000 sq ft venue into a glamorous and sensual place using their expertise in unique design and detailed aesthetics. While it was Avalon founder John Lyons and his team - Anne Tovatt as Project Manager, Richie Worboys in charge of lighting, and Bradley Drummond on the audio side - who designed and specified the entire lighting, trussing and audio solution for the club. John designed and opened the original Avalon in Boston, USA, 22 years ago. He now owns and operates Avalon in Hollywood as well as running John Lyons Systems, his design and installation company. John began by explaining what made this Avalon different from the previous Avalon clubs he had created: “For starters, it is on the other side of the planet. Literally. When going to a new location that is so out of the norm, you must leave all of your notions and ideas about how things work at the curb. It was necessary to start from scratch, forget what we thought we knew and integrate ourselves into the fabric of Singapore. The team were asked to design a multi-zone lighting solution. To accommodate the 3D glass structure and ensure the lighting fixtures would work seamlessly within the environment, the design team opted for a moving lighting rig. It can be raised, lowered, or tilted allowing a number of different lighting patterns to be generated, providing full coverage for the dancefloor. John said: “There is a very complete design package that we worked on for almost a year and there were a lot of challenges to get all of the moving parts to fit inside that space. We did a number of virtual studies of moving truss within the structure. “We were trying to make a moving structure work inside that building, when the building was just water at the time, it hadn’t even been built yet. So we had to create the space in 3D and do modelling of moving trusses in 3D, so it was a very long and complicated task to get it right.” The rigging element, which was crucial to the design, was supplied by Candian company Niscon Inc. The company equipped Avalon


with a Raynok Mk2 console with Ray-Motion 3D software, 24 Concerto variable speed chain hoists - which have an onboard indicator panel that provides the operator with a quick reference of the hoist status and operation at any given time - and six Stagemaker Configuration C concert hoists. President of Niscon, Joseph Jeremy, said: “I think the products were chosen for this project thanks to their smooth motion, load capacity and price point. We had also completed a similar installation at the Haze nightclub in Las Vegas using the 3D flying software.” John settled on a moving head design primarily comprising fixtures from Italian manufacturer Clay Paky. The impressively large lighting rig included: 24 Clay Paky Sharpy, 18 Clay Paky Alpha Spot HPE 700, four Clay Paky Alpha Spot 300, and four Clay Paky Alpha Beam 300 luminaires. John explained why he specified Clay Paky: “We are regular users of Clay Paky products. In addition to using them in Avalon Hollywood, we had just finished installing them in Haze nightclub at City Center and Surrender at Encore (both in Las Vegas). Richie operates the lighting rig in Hollywood and regularly lab tests products in real world applications prior to our specifying them. These fitted the bill.” With 24 fixtures installed, Avalon currently holds the title for the largest number of Sharpys installed in a club environment. With its small footprint and lightweight frame, the Sharpy is an 189W moving beam light which produces a bright, parallel, laser-like beam with an output of 59,760 lux at 20 metres. At Avalon, these laser- like beams dart across the dancefloor producing an ultimate dancing platform for clubbers. When it came to integrating and installing the lighting technology, Singapore-based design and consultancy company, Snipe Media was appointed. Head of the company, Billy Magendran, said: “I love the Sharpy. It is not just the output, but also its colours and speed, and the beam is so very sharp. The Sharpy is built for one specific purpose, and it does it extremely well. “Sharpy is one of the best products they have created. Clay Paky at this the moment is the company to beat. They are shooting high and creating the path for new lighting concepts.” The Spot HPE 700’s are utilised on the dancefloor for their wide array of gobos and strobe effects. These fixtures also take on the responsibility of lighting the models, dancers, artists and DJs on stage during performances. The Alpha Spot 300’s were selected for their compact and lightweight nature, their silent operation and their extremely bright output. While the Alpha Beam 300’s were added to the line-up thanks to their ability to produce super-concentrated


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