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SEE YOU AT INTEGRATED SYSTEMS EUROPE BOOTH 7K170 create a sensation


Create truly sensational multi-display shows with Dataton WATCHOUT™


production and playback


software. Now in award-winning version 5 for even greater impact:


‘Time Lines’ Rome 2007 © Philipp Geist 2011 / VG-Bild-Kunst Bonn. www.p-geist.de / www.videogeist.de Photo by Tommaso Sardelli


– 3D effects: position and rotate media in 3D space – 3D content: stereoscopic production and playback – Enhanced live interaction: direct control from inputs – Dynamic image server: stream live data in your show – Cost-effective multiple displays per computer


www.dataton.com/watchout www.facebook.com/dataton


How concerned are you with the audio elements of your performances, or does somebody else manage them?


For my performances I often work with musicians like the Italian composer Fabrizio Nocci or other electronic or avandgarde musicians. Music takes an important part in my work, it’s a big inspiration for my installations. I usually choose the music and propose the musicians that fit to my ideas and concept of the projects.


Do you have any stand-out projects that were pivotal to your develop- ment?


Some of my projects which have been pivotal for me are, for example: my first exhitibion in the forest in Polling / Weilheim, with large scale paintings, my first audio/ visual project with the musician Martin Gretschmann (Console / Notwist), which was a slide show with my photo works in 1997, also the live video installa- tion with the large symphonic orchestra and Panasonic in Barcelona at the open- ing of the Sonar festival in 2004. Also the outdoor video installation in Zürich for five weeks in 2005. At this time video installations in the public area were very rare. The installation Time Lines in 2007 in Rome on the important museum Palazzo delle Esposizioni. Rome is one of my favourite cities. Also, in 2008, the installation Time Fades in Berlin at the Kulturforum: an outdoor installation with a large ground projection which the visitors could walk into and become a part of the installation. A similar concept to this I presented in Vancouver, Montreal, Eindhoven, Bucarest. My biggest installation so far has been in Bangkok at the Throne Hall. This was a great experience and challenge.


What does the future hold?


Currently I’m working on video installations in New Delhi, India, on an art book with DVD about my photo works and video installations, that will be released early 2012 by the publisher Snoeck, and several exhibitions of my art works and video installation projects. Furthermore, I keep on developing my ongoing water- video-installation project Riverine Zones. For this project, I film worldwide rivers under the surface and develop site specific room installations with the filmed material. Riverine Zones is an art project concerned with the issue of water and pollution of the environment, referring to existing problems in a sensitive and quiet way. www.p-geist.de


Soldier of Orange, Amsterdam: WATCHOUT backdrop. Photo: Joris van Bennekom. Image courtesy Blitz Communications.


Het Scheepvaartmuseum, Amsterdam: WATCHOUT on curved screen. Image courtesy of Rapenburg Plaza.


Starbucks 303 building, Seattle: Lobby video walll with WATCHOUT. Image courtesy of Gary Wilson, CompView and Starbucks 505.


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