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CONNECTING THE COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTOR COMMUNITY


January/February 2012 Volume 18 Number 1


Editor-in-Chief David Ridsdale


+44 (0)1923 690200


Consultant Editor Richard Stevenson PhD


richardstevenson@angelbc.co.uk +44 (0)1291 629640


News Editor Dr.Su Westwater


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Director of SOLAR & IC Publishing Jackie Cannon


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Account Managers Robin Halder


+44 (0)2476 718109 Shehzad Munshi


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USA Representatives Brun Media Tom Brun


Tel: 724 539-2404 Janice Jenkins


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Director of Logistics Sharon Cowley


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Design & Production Manager Mitchell Gaynor


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Circulation Director Jan Smoothy


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Subscriptions Manager Debbie Higham


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Chief Operating Officer Stephen Whitehurst stephen.whitehurst@angelbc.com +44 (0)2476 718970


Directors


Bill Dunlop Uprichard – CEO Stephen Whitehurst – COO Jan Smoothy – CFO Jackie Cannon, Scott Adams, Sharon Cowley, Sukhi Bhadal


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Compound Semiconductor is published eight times a year on a controlled circulation basis. Non-qualifying individuals can subscribe at: £105.00/€158 pa (UK & Europe), £138.00 pa (air mail), $198 pa (USA).Cover price £4.50. All information herein is believed to be correct at time of going to press. The publisher does not accept responsibility for any errors and omissions. The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. Every effort has been made to obtain copyright permission for the material contained in this publication. Angel Business Communications Ltd will be happy to acknowledge any copyright oversights in a subsequent issue of the publication.Angel Business Communications Ltd © Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. Contents may not be reproduced in whole or part without the written consent of the publishers.The paper used within this magazine is produced by chain of custody certified manufacturers, guaranteeing sustainable sourcing.


US mailing information: Compound Semiconductor (ISSN 1096-598X) is published 8 times a year Jan/Feb, March, April/May, June, July,August/September, October, November/December for a subscription of $198 by Angel Business Communications Ltd, Hannay House, 39 Clarendon Road,Watford, Herts WD17 1JA, UK. Periodicals postage paid at Rahway,NJ. POSTMASTER: send address changes to: Compound Semiconductor, c/o Mercury International Ltd, 365 Blair Road,Avenel, NJ 07001


Printed by: Pensord Press. ISSN 1096-598X (Print) ISSN 2042-7328 (Online) © Copyright 2012.


debbie.higham@angelbc.com jan.smoothy@angelbc.com


In many ways, where silicon leads, we follow. Like our bigger brother, we migrate to bigger and bigger substrates, develop tools with greater levels of automation, and try to introduce superior fab management technologies to drive up yields.


Recently, we have also mirrored their latest advance in silicon transistor architectures: At the 2011 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in Washington DC, a collaboration led by Peide Ye’s group from the University of Purdue demonstrated the first three-dimensional MOSFET made with a set of foundry-compatible processes.


One of the greatest strengths of this transistor is its simplicity. It is made by depositing a single layer of InGaAs on InP, before a combination of implantation, photolithography, etching and atomic layer deposition defines the structure.


The relatively straightforward fabrication process will help this transistor to make a commercial impact beyond the 15 nm node. At these length scales, alternatives to silicon are required according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.


Ye’s transistor needs improvements to some key characteristics before it can become a serious contender at the 11 nm node but that’s not its biggest challenge. If III-Vs are going to power the computers of the future, they’ll need to be grown on silicon.


Intel and IQE are looking seriously at this issue, and at IEDM they presented a study comparing the quality of III-Vs-on-silicon grown by MBE – the most popular deposition technology for III-V FETs – and MOCVD. Their finding: MOCVD is at least the equal of its rival.


More details of this effort, as well as a report on Ye’s work, can be found in a round-up of IEDM on page 15. However, if you want to hear directly about this work and learn of other breakthroughs in III-V devices for logic applications, consider booking yourself a seat at CS Europe 2012. This event that will be held on 12-13 March in Frankfurt, Germany, will also detail the progress of a very broad range of compound semiconductor chipmakers. Check out the list of speakers on page 21.


Richard Stevenson Consultant Editor


mitch.gaynor@angelbc.com sharon.cowley@angelbc.com E: tbrun@brunmedia.com E: jjenkins@brunmedia.com T robin.halder@angelbc.com shehzad.munshi@angelbc.com Following silicon’s lead


hroughout the twentieth century, the route to scaling silicon CMOS technology remained the same: build a photolithography tool capable of defining smaller feature sizes. But by the turn of the millennium, additional modifications were needed: The 90 nm node launched in 2002 employed some SiGe to increase the drive current; silicon-dioxide gates were replaced with hafnium oxides in 2007 to stem gate leakage; and this year, new, three-dimensional architectures will be shipped that can control current flow at the 22 nm node.


jackie.cannon@angelbc.com david.ridsdale@angelbc.com


Editorial


January/February 2012 www.compoundsemiconductor.net 3


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