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Cree reveals next generation SiC based LEDs for lighting


CREE is introducing what it says is a breakthrough ; the XLamp XB-D LED.The first LED based on an innovative new Cree technology platform, the XLamp XB-D LED ushers in a new era of price-performance for lighting-class LEDs. This LED can further simplify designs, ultimately removing a key barrier to widespread LED implementation - up-front system cost.


Cree says the XB-D LED delivers twice the lumens-per-dollar of other LEDs, in the industry’s smallest lighting-class footprint of 2.45 mm x 2.45 mm. The XB-D LED is 48 percent smaller than the XLamp XP package and ideal for lighting applications where high lumen density and compact light sources are required.


The innovations behind this next generation of lighting-class LEDs can enable significantly lower prices for LED lighting products by using up to three times fewer LEDs, three times fewer optics and substantially smaller circuit boards than current designs.


“Being a leader means delivering revolutionary, not evolutionary, innovation to drive the LED lighting revolution,” said Mike Watson, Cree senior director of marketing, LED components.


“With this new platform Cree has fundamentally redefined the price- performance paradigm for our components customers. It’s not enough to just make LEDs brighter - it’s also about improving product payback and market acceptance of LED lighting.”


Leveraging Cree’s SiC technology, the XB- D LED delivers up to 139 lumens and 136 lumens per watt in cool white (6000K) or up to 107 lumens and 105 lumens per watt in warm white (3000K), both at 350 mA and 85°C.


XB-D LEDs are also compatible with most existing XP family secondary optics, which can speed the optical design process and create direct cost savings for existing XP family-based designs.


AQT Solar expanding with


$18.7 million funding THE SERIES B investment, which was at a higher valuation for the company than the previous round of funding, brings the total amount of capital that AQT has attracted to date to almost $40 million.


This funding round follows a year of consistent progress and growth for AQT. The company’s Sunnyvale site is now operating around the clock and will have an installed solar cell capacity of more than 30MW by mid-year.


AQT cells are currently used in 100 watt CIGS modules that are being field deployed. By the end of the year, up to 180 watt CIGS modules powered by AQT cells are expected to be available in the market.


AQT’s CIGS 2.0 technology allows for continuous in-line production, which


simplifies and streamlines the manufacturing process, resulting in the highest projected capital efficiency in the industry, while minimising component costs.


This manufacturing pathway has resulted in the development, shipment and scaling of CIGS module product in just four years and for less than $40M in funding, making AQT the market leader in time-to-market and cost-to-market.


“Our business strategy uniquely positions us to compete and grow in an increasingly crowded, noisy and aggressive market,” said Michael Bartholomeusz, CEO of AQT Solar. “AQT is laser focused on what we believe are the key elements to success in any commodity industry: leverage, cost, risk mitigation, partnerships and future proofing.”


12 www.compoundsemiconductor.net January/February 2012


MBE system sales were up 4% in relation to 2010 at €11.5 million, reflective of the good level of sales to compound semiconductor industrial firms and research centres. In 2011, 10 MBE systems were delivered, including three production systems. The services and accessories business was down 18%, set against a slowdown in the North American market.


The fourth quarter of 2011 saw a dynamic level of commercial development. During the period, Riber received nine MBE systems orders, including one production system and eight research systems. More specifically, this growth was achieved thanks to the continued strengthening of positions in Europe and China.


On December 31st, 2011, the order book represented €19.4 million, 12% higher than the previous year. It primarily includes 15 MBE systems, with two production systems and 13 research systems. Only one system is due to be delivered after 2012.Cells and sources order book significantly decreased following the completion of investments in generation 5 OLED production lines.


Riber revenues rocket


RIBER, a provider of MBE equipment saw €29.0 million in revenues for 2011, an increase of 40% in relation to 2010. Fourth-quarter revenues came to €10.5 million. Revenue growth for the provider was driven mainly by the increase in sales of evaporation sources, which multiplied by four over the year. This was mainly due to delivery of major investment orders aimed at setting up OLED screen production lines.


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