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ensure they are at the standard you set yourself?


Luke: For the simple reason that we’re going to be judged by our initial offerings, plus also our collective professional pride in being Black Pudding games, we don’t want to throw any old rubbish out there to just make up the numbers.


Dan: We’re trying to avoid making ‘landfill slots’ and ‘instantly forgettable wins’.


Over the next two years, do you expect to launch games at a faster rate? What lessons have you learned from the development process of your first games?


Dan: We plan to release games only when we’ve got ideas we truly believe in.


Nathan: Tat’s precisely why we state on our website that we’re ‘not just another bloody sausage factory’.


Luke: It has been a much more formidable process than first anticipated, but that doesn’t


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detract from the sense of satisfaction that we’ve all got from seeing our first game released into the wild. All that being said, the team at 1x2 have been nothing short of fantastic in their unstinting support through the development of our initial batch of games, and from what we’ve learned we’ll be able to streamline the process for future projects.


How do you make a name for yourself without tapping into the conventional player base? Are your titles targeted at a specific subset of gamers looking for novel gaming, or is the aim to revolutionise how the industry approaches game development?


Our games because they work a treat on mobile devices, are genuinely fun to play and offer a chance to pocket some chunky wins. I’d also add that they sound lovely too . . . but I would say that, because I did the sound design.


Nathan: We decided to be bold, do different and see what sticks.


Dan: I’d hope that, in time, conventional players will discover, and gravitate towards, our games because they work a treat on mobile devices, are genuinely fun to play and offer a chance to pocket some chunky wins. I’d also add that they sound lovely too . . . but I would say that, because I did the sound design.


Your latest title, Aeterna, is the first game powered by the Orbital Reactor engine. How does the new mechanic deconstruct traditional games in line with Black Pudding's design philosophy? What are your expectations for the game engine?


Luke: At this time we don’t have any expectations. We’re just excited that it’s out there in the players’ hands . . .


Nathan: . . . well hand, because don’t forget our one-handed philosophy. From the reviews that we’ve seen, the initial feedback has been


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