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Vsevolod Lapin, Head of Product, Playson


Fintan Costello, Managing Director, BonusFinder.com


Alexia Smilovic, Chief Regulatory Officer, Relax Gaming


Tamas Kusztos, Head of Sales and Account Management, Kalamba Games


Mark Halstead, Compliance Manager, iSoftBet


larger volumes of players towards unregulated brands. When measures are introduced to protect players, we strongly believe they should not impact the fundamentals of the gaming experience, and instead bring added value to the category. Bringing balanced legislation into force is something that challenges every jurisdiction, so it will be interesting to see how Germany manages market expectations and player protection.


Mark: Every regulated market has its own distinct framework that needs to be set to protect players and ensure they play on regulated brands. We are committed to responsible gaming and comply with the most stringent global regulatory bodies. We are licensed in the UK, Malta and Romania and approved to distribute content in 18 regulated markets including Italy, Spain, Portugal, Hungary, and Romania, to name just a few, with Germany set to be our nineteenth.


In our view, the region will not be less attractive than any other regulated market for companies that have a strong compliance focus, as Germany clearly is set to be. Some measures, such as stake limits and increased spin times, are being adopted in various forms across Europe, designed for the long-term benefit of players and most gaming studios will support these. However, there is the possibility these types of restrictions can deter some and, as we have seen in markets such as Sweden, push


Fintan: It is very simple. It will encourage German players to go to offshore operators for their gameplay as they will be able to get a much better experience with just a couple of clicks. We have seen this happening in other markets that have introduced similar restrictions, such as Sweden. Our own research there clearly showed that players are now searching online for operators that offer bonuses and jackpots that licensees are no longer allowed to offer.


Vsevolod: Stake limits are becoming more apparent within regulated markets across Europe, including the UK and Italy, and so most operators and software providers looking to enter Germany will be aware of how to overcome such restrictions. In fact, the latest data shows that markets that already hold such limitations are still growing in size. It will of course place a greater emphasis on the effectiveness of marketing campaigns within the first few months of the market reopening.


Robert Lee, Commercial Director, Realistic Games


Stake limits and increased spin times, are being adopted in various forms across Europe, designed for the long-term benefit of players and most gaming studios will support these. However, there is the possibility these types of restrictions can deter some and, as we have seen in markets such as Sweden.


Operators with sharper campaigns will win a greater share of the German market and make a return on their investment much faster.


Alexia: Although creating effective player protection measures is said to be the main concern of regulators, the framework seems to heavily edulcorate online casino activity. Games as we know them today will not be allowed in Germany once the transition regime kicks in, with some forbidden and others drastically modified. As the largest economy in Europe, however, Germany is worth fighting for. European markets are no longer about new conquest, but about consolidation. Germany


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA P85


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