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Event Review


Lively discussions ensued with airlines pondering the enormous waste of up to 40% of supplied product. Virgin Australia said this can be due to the use of fresh product when long shelf life products are not available in the market.


Pre-order programmes allowing passengers to choose offerings prior to the flight have helped cut waste but the predominant cause is still lack of data. Bernstein said this is improving all the time, however the more ‘granular’ the information, the more costly it is to retrieve, sort and react to. There is a limit to how much can be anticipated cost effectively. When selling, airlines need to react faster to the passenger dynamics. “Airlines have to start thinking like retailers if that is what they want to be” said DHL’s Chris Jackson. "Is it all worth it?" the question was posed, when the total cost of BoB is considered including the product itself, the 40% wastage, the cost of training, sales devices, credit card fees, banking and accounting fees. And how much does an airline save if it forgets all these cost implications and offers a free foodservice? There were no direct answers to that. BoB has matured in certain sectors – so have the systems that control it – but it was clear that there's still a very long way to go.


Other topics discussed were Quality Assurance, chaired by Gerard


82 WWW.ONBOARDHOSPITALITY.COM


Bertholon of Cuisine Solutions and Abelardo Rodriguez of Gourmet Foods which tackled the problems of maintaining consistency at the final stage of the products' journey – delivery to the passenger. Problems with ovens not calibrated properly were highlighted but the key problem remains training. Years of good manufacturing practice and HACCP procedures have taken care of health and safety issues but high staff turnover and the cost of training staff across many locations remain the main challenge in assuring the quality of the product to the passenger. An oven that burns everything to a crisp, or the hapless flight attendant who


Chef’s Competition


Congratulations to the winner of the 2013 Chef’s Competition – Chef Daniel Klein of LSG Sky Chefs. The competitors were judged by a panel of culinary experts: Chef Darrin Finkel, executive chef of Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen; Chef J. Hemmer, director of sales, On-Board Services, of Cuisine Solutions; Chef David Suscavage, executive chef of House of Blues, Anaheim; and Chef Jimmy Weita, executive chef of Disneyland Hotel and Park Banquets. Chef Klein won a personalised chef’s jacket from Bragard.


Other finalists were: Chef Francisco Garcia, Gate Gourmet; Chef Daniel Klein, LSG Sky Chefs; Chef Jim Litza, D.F.S., Inc. and Chef Tony Ruiz, Flying Food Group.


Pictured left: Devin Liddell presents new ideas; APEX president, Linda Celestino, and the exhibition centre, Anaheim Above: The Round Table debate and (right) Best in Show - Buzz on their stand


messes up just before the passenger gets the meal remains a problem. The solution seems to be more and better consistent training and refreshers.


Best in show


Hats off to the 2013 Best in Show winner – Buzz Products., Australia. Buzz is a global creative product agency supplying luxury amenities, prestige skincare, designer collaborations, children’s activities and amenities, sleepwear and textiles.


2014 – Save the dates! The 2014 APEX/IFSA EXPO will be held September 15-18 in Anaheim, California, USA.


Event sponsor was Marfo and product sponsors were Fortune Fish & Gourmet and Great Western Beef Company. In his truly entertaining style, Chef Bob Rosar added colourful commentary as the Competition master of ceremonies.


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