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HOT BEVERAGES


“It’s an iconic brand and judging by our strong sales, it certainly appears that passengers still like a taste of home while they are in the air. Tetley’s extensive range also means we can extend our offering at any time to meet demand.”





HERBALS Teas also seem to be at the forefront of product development. A university student in the UK, for example, has pioneered a new type of herbal/fruit tea for the foodservice market in a competition run by the British Frozen Food Federation (BFFF). The product created by


Sumaiyah Patel freezes the fruits and herbs of four tea flavours into a one inch square ice cube which caterers simply place into a cup, add hot water and serve. BFFF director general, Brian


Young said: “These are pure genius. The process of freezing the fruit and herb tea cubes acts as a natural preservative so they are consumed at the peak of their ripeness and quality. This brilliance of flavour would be impossible with dried.” (Read more - page 32). Likewise Fruitbroo (fruitbroo.


com) is breaking with the bag tradition and offering cases of 8 x 100ml bottles of its juicy fruit tea. These fruit are specially blended to be served hot – just combine two teaspoonsful with hot water. They are 100 per cent natural with no caffeine, gluten or dairy and come in six flavours including banana and coconut, elderflower and lime, and apple, ginger and spice. Kandula Tea (kandulatea.com) has launched two new pure herbal infusions. Vanilla Chai Rooibos is a blend of Rooibos with hints of Ceylon spices and vanilla flavours; and chamomile rose is a blend of rose-infused chamomile tea with whole chamomile flowers, rose


petals and lavender buds. A newcomer also looking to make a mark in the travel sector is Yogi Tea (yogitea.eu) which works through UK Importer, Food Sellers. Its product range includes a ready to drink chai. The one litre tetra pack contains the original classic Yogi tea blend of organic herbs and spices which has been brewed and sweetened with organic raw cane sugar and so is ready to serve. When blended 50/50 with milk, it creates a chai latte, or it can be chilled and served cold. And if the range and diversity of flavours offered by up-and- coming Teapigs is anything to go, the traditional cuppa is clearly still evolving. Its range includes the likes of chilli chai, chocolate flake tea, popcorn tea and tung ting oolong tea! The company aims to have a tea to suit every mood and temperament and invites visitors to its site www.teapigs.co.uk to select flavours via its mood-o-meter.


Likewise Hampstead Teas


(hampsteadtea.com) of London, which specialises in quality blends


"It certainly appears that passengers still like the taste of home while they are in the air"


of black and green teas, also offers flavoured options including black vanilla, red fruit, lemon and orange and a range of ice teas including elderflow oolong, lemon green and raspberry darjeeling.


PACKAGING


Innovations are also being made in the hot beverage packaging and delivery styles.


Ambican, which sells over a


million hot drink cups a year, puts eco-awareness as a priority with its biodegradable, recyclable and compostable products to cut down carriers' carbon footprints.


Eilles Tee (eilles-tee.co.uk) has innovated the traditional tea bag with its Tea Diamond pyramid- shaped bag. The tea is sold in a filigree gloss-fabric weave said to give leaf and broken tea the room for maximum contact with the water. The design


reduces drips too and comes in 27 varieties – 10 organic. While Grower’s Cup


(growerscup.com) has launched a range of gourmet teas and coffees that are brewed in the packaging ‘pot’. Open the reinforced pouch, pour in hot water and within 2-4 


WWW.ONBOARDHOSPITALITY.COM 57


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