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HOW WE WORK IT OUT 1


ECONOMY B737-700


2 3 4 5 67 8 9 10 11 12 ?


SMS EMAIL 3-3 30”-31” 17.2” N/A 2”-4” ST  7”  O⁄  


1 AIRCRAFT TYPE AND CLASS We have arranged the survey by aircraft type to allow you to compare products across the fleet in each class.


2 SEAT CONFIGURATION


This is the way seats are arranged throughout the plane. The layout is important to know as increasingly airlines are squeezing more seats into their twin-aisle jets by configuring them 3-4-3 as opposed to 3-3-3, for example, meaning you have less space.


3 SEAT PITCH


This is the distance between seats, measured from a fixed point on one seat to the same point on the one in front. The measurement differs between airlines, but it indicates how much legroom you will get.


seats, measured from a fixed


e point on the one in front. The n airlines, but it indicates how


4 SEAT WIDTH


Airlines obtain the seat width either by measuring the cushion, the distance between the armrests or from the outside of one armrest to the outside of the other


either by measuring the cushion, mrests or from the outside of one other.


5 SEAT LENGTH A measurement for fully-flat seats only 6 SEAT RECLINE


This can be measured from either a horizontal, a 90-degree or take-off position.


her a horizontal, a 90-degree 7 SEAT TYPE


This mainly depends on a seat’s recline. We have identified five main types: standard (ST), cradle-style (CS), fixed-shell (FS), angled lie-flat (AF) and fully-flat (FF).


t’s recline. ypes: ), (AF)


8 INDIVIDUAL SCREEN AND SIZE With more airlines installing personal screens, it can be a shock to discover one that hasn’t. But the size of the displays can differ.


AND (IFE) – the


t


ND SIZE ersonal discover one e displays


9 AUDIO-VIDEO ON-DEMAND AVOD in-flight entertainment (IFE) – the ability to stop, start, rewind and pause movies, music, games and TV shows – is a must-have feature across all cabin classes. It has largely replaced the old-fashioned system of playing a selection of movies on a loop.


ability to stop,


es, music, games and TV re across all cabin classes. fashioned system of playiing p.


p 94 becomes redundant – the length of your bed is what matters.


eats only. This is when the pitch gth of your bed is what matters.


10 POWER SOURCE Many aircraft have in-seat power, be it through UK, EU, US, South African (SA), Japanese (Japan), USB or universal (UNI) sockets.


11 INTERNET


Many carriers are now either allowing passengers to connect in-flight to the web through GPRS (charged via network providers at international roaming rates) or, more commonly, by installing onboard wifi at a set fee.


12 MOBILE PHONE USE MOBILE PHONE USE


Some airlines allow passengers to use their mobile phones in-flight. Prices depend on network providers and not all carriers will permit all forms of communication, so we have specified which are available (see inside the mobile phone icon for whether emails, SMS messages or voice calls are possible on board).


Some airlines allow passengers to use their mobile phones in-flight. Prices depend on network providers and not all carriers will permit all forms of communication, so we have specified which are available (see inside the mobile phone icon for whether emails, SMS messages or voice calls are possible on board).


BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM BUYING NGBUSINESSTRAVE ES


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