This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CASH OR CREDIT? But the key problem is that many service- related tips are, in fact, usually paid in cash rather than plastic. The American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA) identifies some ten different categories of hotel employees who may expect a cash gratuity, generally for performing the service a guest may reasonably believe is already part of the room rate. These are: the hotel’s courtesy shuttle driver; the valet or parking attendant; bell staff and porters; door staff; concierges; delivery of special items; room service; bartenders; waiters/waitresses; and housekeeping. The UK equivalent of the AHLA does not publish its own list, but the US tradition of tipping virtually every employee you have contact with in a hotel is becoming increasingly prevalent on this side of the Atlantic.


y service- id i


The ubiquity of the tipping culture in


North America – especially in hotels – is re- flected in the formal travel policies of most major US and multinational companies. “A large number of corporate policies do cover circumstances where, under local custom, gratuities are expected and also that travel- lers will be reimbursed where the charge is not inclusive,” points out Nigel Turner, CWT UK’s senior director for programme management and business services. “This doesn’t specifically promote to staff that they should tip – it’s just saying that if it’s an expected factor, you should do it and the company will reimburse you.” At software provider Citrix, for example, the global T&E policy allows gratuities up to a pre-defined percentage of the total bill, which can be reimbursed where identi- fied and itemised on original receipts. Jef Robinson, a global travel buyer for Citrix, says: “This is a straightforward process for restaurant meals, as well as many taxi and chauffeur services.” But he points out there is “an obvious


gap” for services such as doormen, porters, housekeeping, some taxis and small places to eat where cash tips are the norm but not identified on receipts or invoices. “In these cases it may not be possible to reimburse all


36 BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


Tipping: the lowdown


  travelling on company businesses is fraught with potential problems – such as whether tips are allowed, how they are paid and if they will be reimbursed as part of normal expenses.


  written travel policy exactly which gratuities can be included and those that will not be reimbursed, especially if paid in cash.


  and cultures in different countries: gratuities in Japan, for example, are not the norm, while they are widely expected in the US.


  submissions break out the various elements of a claim, including tips, to ensure companies have full visibility of where expenditure is going.


  allow employees to keep on top of managing expenses while on the road: most expense solutions offer a gratuities function, no matter what the platform.


  corporate card, as they can be tracked and reconciled more easily; but if cash is used, make it clear what is needed to back up the claim.


policies on this side of the Atlantic. Karen strategic relationship manager


policies o Lopez, st Ch


li i


f for Chambers Travel Management, says she has not come across a travel policy that formally covers tipping. “If a travel- ler adds a tip, it would usually be out of their own pocket, unless the tip is already included in the bill as a service charge, or the appropriate manager has agreed to it at their discretion,” she says. “I can’t see this position changing.”


Smaller businesses also appear less likely to embrace formal policies. At the Medical and Dental Defence Union of Scotland, the UK medical indemnity union for healthcare professionals, travel manager Peter Macey says it “does not have any hard and fast rules in place covering tipping”. But his own opinion “is that a gratuity is a personal matter and one which I, for example, would not try and claim back through expenses”. His view emphasises that tipping remains


a thorny issue for both those travelling and those charged with managing the expenses involved. Rightly or wrongly, Citrix’s Rob- inson points out, “whether employees are enabled to reward those providing a service is likely further to drive change in the hospitality industry in the long term. “If organisations do not reimburse, trav-


gratuities expected by those providing services,” he says.


OUT OF POCKET Cultural differences between North America and the UK on tipping perhaps reflects the reduced prominence given to how gratuities are accounted for in T&E


ellers are less likely to leave tips, resulting in reduced remuneration for those directly affected, although hopefully this will ulti- mately be addressed by their employers.” But newcomers to the T&E world – such as fast-growing taxi service Uber – are also driving change. Uber specifically states on its website, for example, that ‘there’s no need to tip’ – something that some seasoned travellers find difficult to accept. Yet there is one group of service providers vital to business travel that are not normally tipped: flight attendants. Given that their role in flight is primarily to ensure the safety of passengers rather than dispensing food and drink, most airlines formally prohibit the acceptance of gratuities by flight at- tendants – although anecdotal evidence suggests this does not stop some people trying. Nothing is ever simple, it seems, when it comes to tipping. 


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140