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ADVERTORIAL


SECURITY


EU agrees deal on sharing of passenger data


THE EUROPEAN UNION (EU) HAS AGREED A DEAL to share airline passenger details for the “prevention, detection and prosecution” of terrorist offences and serious crimes. The passenger name record (PNR) system, which was first


proposed in 2007, means airlines must provide countries within the EU with passenger data for flights entering or departing the union. It will also allow, but not oblige, member states to collect PNR data concerning selected intra-EU flights. Each member state will be required to set up a passenger information unit, which will receive the PNR data from the airlines. The UK and Ireland have opted into this directive; however, Denmark is not participating.


IS YOUR ONLINE


BOOKING TOOL KEEPING UP WITH THE PACE?


AN IMPORTANT QUESTION TO ASK YOURSELF is how long your online booking tool has been in place – chances are the longer it is, the less it has been looked at. It is important to have an understanding of the


products out there to know how to achieve best value for your travellers and travel programme. With online adoption reaching levels of up to 90 per cent for point- to-point travel, it is essential to understand how the latest airline products and ancillaries are presented to your travellers in the booking tool.


Everyone is used to booking their own leisure flights BOOKINGS


JAL SUSPENDS PARIS- NARITA ROUTE AFTER TERROR ATTACKS


JAPAN AIRLINES IS SUSPENDING FLIGHTS between Paris and Tokyo Narita after November’s attacks significantly hit demand on the daily route. A spokesperson told news agency AFP the service


would be suspended from January 12 through to February 29, “except for a few days... The company will decide whether to resume the Paris-Narita flights in March after observing the situation in the new year.” Instead, JAL will concentrate on its daily Paris- Haneda service, which has seen a 40 per cent drop in demand following the attacks in November, compared to a 60 per cent decline on the Narita route. According to hotel data specialist STR Global, Paris occupancy rates plummeted by around 40 per cent year- on-year a week after the attacks on November 13. The day after the tragedy they dropped 12.7 per cent, then continued to fall – 22.7 per cent, 26.1 per cent and 29.8 per cent four days on. Despite the decline in occupancy, there was little change in average daily rates in the city.


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


direct via airline websites, which are constantly improving and evolving to better meet the needs of travellers. Online booking tools replicate this in the corporate environment but need proactive intervention to ensure that the latest technology is being used.


Questions should be asked such as: “Is the traveller able to select the different fare bundles offered by the carriers?”, “Can they add their membership number and select their preferred seating?”, “When was the last time we updated the travel policy online to reflect new fares?”, “How can I tell what is included with this fare I am about to book?”. While most travel policies will guide users to ‘lowest on the day’, there may be a better-value fare more applicable to that traveller’s needs at that time. So how can you ensure that your online booking tool is fit for purpose? It’s always good to speak with your travel management company to find out if you have all the features and benefits you need. Or get in touch with our business sales team to find out how easyJet is working with online booking tools and corporations to drive maximum value to your travel programme.


To find out more contact


us at european.sales@easyJet.com Anthony Drury


Head of business, easyJet


BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


7


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