This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ITM Conference, Ireland


Senior industry figures spoke on topical issues at the annual Institute of Travel and Meetings event held in Dublin’s Westbury Hotel. Paul Revel reports


CITYJET FOUNDER AND EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN PAT BYRNE predicted a future where airlines increasingly market their brands while not operating their own aircraft. The veteran aviation boss told ITM delegates he could envisage a “progressive separation in legacy carriers, between marketing and production”, with those airlines contracting out operations because otherwise “they can’t survive against the LCCs [low-cost carriers]”.


He added that the legacy carriers could leverage their brands while benefiting from a more flexible workforce offered by outsourced contractors operating the aircraft. Byrne also told delegates that he does not believe in air miles-type schemes: “They are poor value for the customer and expensive for airlines.” But loyalty schemes are different, he said. These can offer what customers really want: recognition, and access to a personal level of service “with a human being on the phone”, plus benefits such as fast-track security access.


CLOUDY FUTURE Also on the panel making predictions for 2020 was Paschal Nee, director of Travelport-owned IT firm Mobile Travel Technologies (MTT). Nee said at some point all travellers’ individual profiles would be in the cloud, with those travellers choosing who they could share their personal data with – whether it be a car rental provider, an airline or a hotel, or any other travel supplier. This will enable “more contextual”


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


Google’s Damian Lynch talks ‘anticipation’ technology


Cityjet founder Pat Byrne


mobile technology, he said, with all suppliers interacting with a traveller’s profile to provide seamless travel.


ANTICIPATION Google account manager Damian Lynch said the search engine is “literally just scraping the surface of ‘anticipation’ – it’s going to really take off”. He was referring to ever


improving technology that provides the most relevant search and booking content by anticipating the user’s needs, based on individual profile and


history. The challenge for travel managers, said Lynch, was to provide tools that can match the user experience of Google and online travel agencies. He said a game-changer in travel booking would be the growth of mobile booking, a view echoed by Aer Lingus director Theo Ocks, who said this trend would be enabled by more reliable mobile payment solutions. Google’s Lynch said the UK was behind Japan in this arena, citing the example from leisure booking statistics:


conversion rates for a Ð1,500 holiday search on a mobile device in Japan are 9-16 per cent, while in the UK they are 0.1-1 per cent.


Buying Business Travel was partner to the inaugural ITM Business Travel Awards Ireland, which were presented during the gala dinner. Winners included the Irish Defence Forces’ Commandant Dorothy Donnelly as Best Travel Manager, while Taxback International won the Best Travel Technology Provider category.


BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 23


Photo: travelbiz.ie


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140