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AIRLINES SECURITY


United joins Delta with on-time


guarantee for corporates


UNITED AIRLINES HAS PROMISED ITS CORPORATE CUSTOMERS it will beat American and Delta in on-time arrivals or offer service credits for upgrades and fees. The airline said it’s “so confident” it will deliver the same level of service in 2016 as its rivals, it will compensate “qualified corporate accounts” if it fails to meet that commitment.


The announcement follows a similar move by Delta last year – the key difference being Delta’s credits can be used to pay fares, while United’s can only be used towards seat upgrades and other ancillary costs.


Once a flight is delayed, United will


credit the corporate account with the relevant compensation; this can then be redeemed from January 1, 2017. United said businesses will qualify for the service credits if they are a select global-, US- or Canadian-based corporate account with a share agreement, and the contract is at least 95 per cent compliant.


AIRLINES


Cathay to resume Gatwick service


AFTER AN ABSENCE OF ALMOST 25 YEARS, Cathay Pacific is planning to resume flights between Gatwick and Hong Kong. Subject to government approval, it will launch four weekly non-stop flights from September 2. The new service will complement the airline’s five-times daily service from Heathrow, offering a total of 39 flights a week between the two cities. Cathay will operate the service from Gatwick’s south terminal with an A350-900 aircraft featuring business, premium economy and economy classes.


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


ANALYSIS: TERRORISM AND RISK MANAGEMENT


Security expert David Holley on the implications of recent terror attacks across the world for the business travel sector


ATTACKS IN FRANCE, TURKEY, TUNISIA, AND MALI, and the almost-certain bombing of Metrojet 9268 in Egypt has meant that terrorism is once again in the headlines. So what does this mean for the business travel manager? Most significantly, these incidents


ram home the importance of robust risk management programmes. In ad- dition, travel tracking and clear lines of communication between travel managers and travellers are critical. On November 13, the mobile network was kept operational throughout the attacks in Paris; this meant that GPS travel tracking worked. Essential, but often overlooked, is the need to have a sensible and flexible reaction plan up your sleeve. It always helps to make travellers aware of emer- gency courses of action prior to travel. There is a tendency to evacuate


travellers from a country during or immediately after a crisis. However, complex attacks increasingly involve striking multiple targets. Therefore, risks at airports, railway stations and trains should be considered, too. Travellers can be caught up in a secondary incident as they try to evacuate. Often, ‘hibernation’ is a more appro-


priate response; this means keeping travellers in a safe location until the


dangers have passed. Travellers will often complain about this counter intui- tive approach as they just want to get out, but pre-briefing them that you may keep them in situ, in a safe location, will dispense with a lot of angst. Be ready to speak to their families as well, who may also want reassurance. This does mean a safe location needs to be identified. Large hotels may not be the answer as they are often attrac- tive targets. Airbnb is often dismissed for safety reasons by corporate travel programmes, but could potentially serve as a safe bolt hole. A discreet Airbnb property may offer greater security than a flash hotel full of fellow travellers. Additionally, start information sharing with other corporate travel managers – common solutions might be quicker than trying to fix a problem on your own.


A lasting impact of the latest attacks


in Europe, could be an increase in border controls and reversal of freedom of movement legislation. Sadly, terrorism is a problem that is not going away. All the more reason to keep preparing for the next incident.


 David Holley is director and founder of security consultancy HP Risk Management; hpriskmanagement.co.uk


BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 9


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