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Somo’s Jermaine Williams (left) demonstrates the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset THE ROAD AHEAD Avis UK and leading industry experts analyse the future of mobility


MOBILITY IS, AS IT WERE, ON THE MOVE and Avis, with Client Advisory Board (CAB) partners Audi, Frost & Sullivan, Somo and Zipcar, has published a white paper entitled Courage, Collaboration and the Future of Mobility. This is the result of the CAB’s collective insight and analysis, and embraces telematics, connectivity, hybrid and electric cars, driverless cars and more. Here we report on its findings. “The automotive sector, in particular, is anticipated to go through more significant change in the next ten years than it has since the first Model T rolled off the production line in 1908,” says Nina Bell, Avis managing director for the UK, Norway, Denmark and Sweden. Mobility means a smooth, connected and consistent journey, whether a commute, a domestic trip or travel abroad, and it means having infrastructure and networks to ensure doing business in Shanghai is as easy as in Crawley. Traditional modes of transport are changing, so the travel industry needs to assess what current technologies, services and modes of mobility are vital to UK businesses, and to predict their progression.


Where a car used to be the ultimate symbol of freedom and independence, consumers increasingly see ownership as an expense and a burden, particularly in cities. This has inspired a surge in demand for car-sharing services such as Carshare and Zipcar, whose sharing economy model particularly appeals to the younger generation. Already, nearly seven million people use some kind of shared service worldwide. Demographic changes, including urbanisation and increasing population density, have transformed mobility. And our transport network has become more integrated: apps allow more efficient journey planning, people take the train and then hire a car, use a car share, call a cab by phone or app, or take a bus or tram.


CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES “Many organisations offer company cars to just 20 per cent of the workforce, based on job roles and as a perk or part of the remuneration package,” says Martyn Briggs, industry principal, mobility, for Frost & Sullivan UK. This means corporate mobility services


provide a potential transport solution to the remaining 80 per cent of the company, creating an opportunity for vendors of those services. And expense management provider Concur’s partnership with Airbnb and Uber allows receipts to be integrated with other company expenses, leading the way for others.


Much has been written about the vagaries of grey fleet – employees who drive their own car for business. It is a thorny subject: both an opportunity and a challenge, partly because the largest opportunity for driving down travel costs and reducing employees’ reliance on their own vehicles arguably lies in the public sector, making the problem a political one, according to general manager of Zipcar Mark Walker.


GREEN INNOVATION The environmental debate continues and electric and hybrid vehicles play a major role, also posing both an opportunity and a challenge. In Norway, there is a significant fleet of Tesla vehicles and in Denmark there are almost 700 electric


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