This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PUBLIC SECTOR BY CATHERINE CHETWYND


Chambers Travel looks after the Houses of Parliament and NHS Scotland. “MPs can book what they like, but the IPSA guidelines say how much of that travel expenditure can be reimbursed,” says operations director, Julie Cope. “We invoice IPSA for what is within the guide- lines and if there is anything outside, we invoice the MP directly. There is also a travel policy for employees within the House who are not Members of Parliament.” For NHS Scotland, greater flexibility


is required – for example, transporting patients from the islands to a hospital on the mainland. They may need nurses or doctors to accompany them, or breathing apparatus, or be disabled. And no one can predict being ill or being detained in hospital, so last-minute travel and at- tendant higher fares go with the territory. “The travel plan has to be fluid,” says Cope. “Sometimes travellers are not able to comply with policy and a restricted ticket can turn out to be a false economy if it has to be changed because a hospital keeps the patient waiting, they have to stay in or an appointment changes.” Although hotels give government rates,


best rate on the day is increasingly the norm. “We have a hotel programme with negotiated rates at properties around


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


MPs’ expenditure no longer has moat and duck-house implications


Westminster for MPs,” she says. “When members travel overseas, we tend to contact the local offices they are going to visit, to find out what rates are available. There are deemed government rates in the industry, but sometimes you can get a better rate on the day, so we always look for those.”


Mandating can be a thorny issue in the public and private sectors alike. The government is largely reluctant to mandate travel, so MPs do not have to book through Chambers, although most of them do because it holds negotiated rates. However, NHS Scotland mandates, and in the central government frame- work, use of the TMC is mandated. Generally, the public sector sees bookers adhere to travel policy principles. “Controls across the public sector are fairly robust,” says CEO of Redfern Travel,


Mark Bowers, whose company handles central government travel management services. “The number of people that use a centrally negotiated contract is much higher than in the private sector because it is easier to get travellers and bookers to comply with policy. “We can enforce policy through our online booking tool, Trips, or have looser controls that allow booking outside policy, giving reasons for doing so,” he says. HRG has 530 government clients


worldwide, ranging from NATO and International Red Cross, to 46 in the UK, the largest of which are the Min- istry of Defence, and Foreign & Com- monwealth Office. Best rate on the day applies because economy class travel is the norm. This makes it difficult to negoti- ate discounted air fares, because airlines will agree to only a limited number of discounted tariffs. In addition, there is a risk the TMC will commit to providing a volume of business it cannot meet. “Corporate deals are changing. Long-haul still has value and relevance, but short-haul is a thing of the past where programme management is concerned. However, there are soft benefits, such as extra hold baggage, that make it more attractive,” says HRG’s


BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 89


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140