This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THE ANNUAL BUSINESS TRAVEL SHOW (BTS) is a well established fixture on the calendar. This year it takes place at Olympia Grand in London, on February 24-25 (see preview, p84). Last year saw a 15 per cent increase in attendance, with 7,400 visitors. The show will feature an extensive three-day programme, including


the annual pre-show half-day conference for hosted buyers on February 23, at the Novotel London West hotel in Hammersmith. Show organisers are expecting around 400 buyers to take part in the hosted programme this year. Buying Business Travel is the official UK media partner of the BTS.


THE INSTITUTE OF TRAVEL AND MEETINGS (ITM) has formed a new education com- mittee to ensure its training programme is “relevant, new and valuable for our members”. Plans for 2016 include five workshops for buyers throughout the year, looking at popular subjects, such as sourcing for travel management companies (TMCs) and travel technol- ogy. These sessions will also include new content on data and presentation skills, as well as global consolidation of travel programmes. It is also introducing five ITM Summits to give members the chance to discuss and debate key issues such as distribu- tion, compliance and risk management. For suppliers, ITM is adding 12 half-day training courses, which are designed to help them get a “better understanding” of what travel buyers want and need. ITM’s biggest event this year is the annual conference, which will be held at Celtic Manor resort in Wales on May 3-5. The event will also mark ITM’s 60th anniversary. CEO Simone Buckley says: “Having explored what the mega-


116 BBT JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


trends are and what they might mean to the industry, we will delve deeper to identify challenges and opportunities for the travel procurement and management community. “We will have some exciting plenary


and breakout sessions, with a focus on the collaboration and sharing of expertise from across the supply chain.” Other ITM plans include the launch


of buyer-only benchmarking groups to allow members to “share best practice in a private environment”. “We are taking more of our events out to the regions, with a conference in Dublin in November for the Irish market, summits in Scotland and Manchester, and benchmarking groups around the UK,” adds Buckley. “We plan to make our events even more interactive and have new and fresh ideas in terms of delivery for 2016.”


ITM is continuing its partnership, which initially started in 2012, with the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply (CIPS). The two organisations last year produced their first ‘How to...’


guide for those working in travel procure- ment, Business Travel Category Procurement and Management, which breaks down the five ‘phases’ of creating a managed travel programme. There are also two levels of formal qual- ifications available to ITM members: the Fundamentals of Business Travel Manage- ment and the Global Travel Professional (GTP) certification, both offered through ITM’s partnership with the Global Busi- ness Travel Association (GBTA). “All of our events are designed as a


pathway to lead members to becoming GTP-qualified and are both GTP and CPD (Continuing Professional Development) accredited,” says Buckley. “CPD points are recognised across most professions and this accreditation helps reinforce our commitment to educa- tion and best practice.”


ITM members earn both GTP and CPD points through attending the institute’s training events. “Since we launched CPD in March 2015, ITM has delivered more than 150 CPD hours across our events to members,” says Buckley.


BUYINGBUSINESSTRAVEL.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140