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September, 2021


www.us-tech.com


Page 73 Würth Launches Intelligent Vehicle Controllers


MIAMISBURG, OH — The ICCS controllers (Intelligent Control and Command Systems) from Würth Elektronik ICS are solu- tions for controlling standard and comfort functions in mobile mach - ines and commercial vehicles. Two new modules extend the


product range of these intelligent and efficient controllers, which can be used independently or as an extension of an existing CAN network: the ICCS 64P V2 CAN controller for direct connection to a PCB-based central electrical unit and the ICCS 121P CAN con- troller in IP65 metal housing. The controllers feature 16-bit


processors and enable functions such as relay switching, sensor evaluation detection and monitor- ing the status of the fuses via the CAN bus. The ICCS 64P V2 CAN controller from Würth Elektronik ICS is equipped with more than 30 inputs of various types, two CAN interfaces and an optional LIN master interface. Among other things, this


BAE’s FAST Labs Enables Access to


Intel Tech FALLS CHURCH, VA — A new strategic business agreement is enabling BAE Systems’ FAST Labs™ research and development organization to have early access to select Intel technologies. The agreement will enable


BAE Systems to develop and more quickly field next-genera- tion defense applications based on Intel’s most advanced technology. While commercial off-the-shelf semiconductor technology has increasingly been incorporated into U.S. defense applications, military-grade technology re - quires domestically developed custom capabilities that go beyond commercially available technology. To date, this develop- ment lag of customizing commer- cial technology has resulted in significant time gaps between chip-level technology and defense applications being fielded. This announcement comes


on the heels of other new collab- orations between BAE Systems and Intel, including on Intel’s recently launched FPGA technol- ogy and on the SHIP-Digital pro- gram, which will extend Intel’s wideband radio frequency signal processing platform to the most size, weight, and power-con- strained defense applications. Contact: BAE Systems, Inc.,


2941 Fairview Park Drive, Falls Church, VA 22042 % 571-461-6000 Web: www.baesystems.com


See at the Battery Show, Booth 532


See at The Battery Show, Booth 2531


enables the sensor values to be transmitted to the CAN bus or data to be exchanged between independent bus systems. It also enables gateway/filter functions and the conversion of data from LIN battery management systems or LIN rain/light sensors to the CAN bus. In addition, the con- troller can directly control loads of up to 2A per output. ICCS in IP65 housing Würth Elektronik ICS offers the ICCS 121P CAN Controller as an alternative to the ICCS 64P V2 CAN Controller. The controller is mounted in


metal housing and meets the requirements of protection class


IP65. The module is based on the ICCS 64P V2 CAN Controller and also has 16 additional low-


side outputs. The signal distribu- tion of the control unit is carried out via an 81- and a 40-pin con- nector. The connectors have sev- eral split signals that allow a pass-through design of the wiring harness. The module is also equipped with poly fuses (2 × 3A and 1 × 5A) for protected supply of external devices. Contact: Wurth Electronics


Mobile machine and commercial vehicle CAN controllers.


ICS, Inc., 1982 Byers Road, Miamisburg, OH 45342 % 877-690-2207 E-mail: cs@we-ics.com Web: www.we-ics.com


See at The Battery Show, Booth 2426


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