This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
hiring staff. So if you’re more at home with putters than sales pitches or profit forecasts, but you’d love to work for yourself, then help is at hand. Franchising can be thought of as an ongoing business education in this regard.


The choice is enormous Most people know McDonald’s and Subway are franchises, but there are a number of other big-name brands using the model, including O2, Clarks Shoes, Domino’s Pizza, Thorntons and Toni & Guy. But those are just the tip of the iceberg. There are more than 900 brands using a franchise model in this country, and the chances are high that you used some of their services recently, either personally or professionally. Sports, fitness, consultancy, landscaping and gardening, pubs and restaurants, auto services, marketing, renewable energy, pet care, home improvement, retail, hotels, healthcare, couriers, children’s services; the range is highly diverse and it means whatever your passion and budget, there’s a franchise to suit you.


Do something you love


The initial and ongoing training and support on offer with any franchise means you can go into business according to what you want to do, not necessarily your career experience. Transferable skills are all-important – leadership, work ethic and


people skills, for example, rate highly in what’s sought-after in a franchisee. Tired of the office? Reached a corporate ceiling? Undervalued? Then find something you’re passionate about and turn it into your livelihood.


Lifestyle: the choice is yours People invest in a franchise for many different reasons. It might be financial, you may want to spend more time with your family, escape the rat race, work from home instead of commuting, or go into business with family or friends.


It’s suitable for all demographics Young or old, male or female, any religion or race: all are thriving in franchising. While the average age of starting franchisees is in their 40s, one-fifth in the last two years were aged under 30; women enjoy a far higher rate of business ownership than SMEs generally in this country, and older people are valued for their experience, calm head and ability to handle people and situation.


There’s a system to follow


“If you’re considering starting a franchise then caution, research and due diligence are your watchwords...”


If you want a business that wraps up in time for the school run, then those are available; if you’re looking for a six- or seven-figure income, they’re here too. Understanding your motivators is a vital step in determining the right franchise for you.


People who want complete autonomy over every business decision aren’t well suited to franchising. The model revolves around systems, which need to be followed – the legal contract (franchise agreement) and operations manuals help achieve this by setting out the rights and obligations of both franchisee and franchisor. Franchisees are encouraged to share initiatives – the Big Mac possibly the most famous such creation – but there’s a system in place for a reason: it’s tried and tested.


Look before you leap If you’re considering starting a franchise then caution, research and due diligence are your watchwords; don’t fall in love with something and sign a contract without exploring it thoroughly, including the people behind the business. A well-researched franchisee is likely to be a more successful one, and a comprehensive understanding of the franchise and its culture is essential.


June 2016 | BusinessFranchise.com | 15


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138