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Franchise Focus


Danny Hanlon


A franchise in bloom


Franchisees with Granite Tranformations are extending their retail presence by opening in-store concession sites – particularly in garden centres where there is a large weekly footfall of customers who are exactly the right demographic for the home improvements franchise


INVESTMENT LEVEL: £18,000 (conceSSIon SITe pAckAGe) 52 | Businessfranchise.com | May 2012 O nline retailing is


outperforming the high street in terms of sales growth, although it still accounts for less than 10 per cent of overall


spend. One reason for this is that some products do not lend themselves so easily to purchase over the internet – items that have to be measured or custom-made, or products that have to be seen and touched to appreciate their qualities.


Home improvements franchise Granite


Transformations knows this to be true of its core product line – kitchen worktops. The distinctive slimline profile, yet durable high- quality finish, really has to be seen to be fully appreciated – and where better than in a retail showroom?


That is why Granite Transformations has invested in the effective in-store merchandising and display of its ‘top that fits on top’ and developed cutaway worktop models demonstrating the unique installation process. As many Granite Transformations franchisees will confirm, once seen and touched, the product effectively sells itself. So, while most Granite Transformations sales transactions are actually concluded in the home, for customers to have the initial ‘touch and see’ experience, a retail showroom is the ideal starting point. Indeed, the franchisor’s own data analysis indicates that most customers live within 30 miles of a showroom and are likely to have visited at least once, confirming that retail premises are indeed a catalyst for sales growth.


Investment: £10k-£20k


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