This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SOFTWARE  MICROSOFT INTERVIEW


Steve Ballmer told the crowd at the New York launch that Microsoft had aimed to create a “thoroughly modern” smartphone


lessons and carried them forward. Similarly, with Windows Phone there is a lot we learned. The first thing we learned is that the


market is bigger than just the business user. When you think about the products we built, we really built for a customer who had since evolved. In the early 2000s the only people who could afford a phone with this kind of functionality were not like you and me; they were in suits, business-like. We kept building for that customer and what happened in 2005, 2006, 2007 is that there were a lot more people who said: “Hey, I actually want to stay in touch with my friends and family.” And they didn’t have the same aesthetic or functional desires that the previous business users had, so we really took that in our stride and tried to deliver on those needs.


In previous versions of Windows


Mobile there were these really complex icons and screens and screens of menus. Even if you look at some of our competitors I don’t think anyone really anticipated as many applications or as much growth of functionality and they’re starting to run into dead ends and trying to change the way they function.


Do you think that Microsoft made any mistakes with Windows Mobile? Yeah, we made a lot of mistakes. I’ll give you an analogy – many people don’t remember but we actually built a game console called the Sega Dreamcast. It was not very well received for a variety of reasons, but the company stuck at it and we got Xbox, so we took a lot of really tough


www.pcr-online.biz


How will you attract app developers back to the platform? There’s three things. It turns out developers actually want to build on cool products, so job number one is to build a cool product. Number two is to sell the product – at the end of the day, developers will


go where the market opportunity is, so the more devices we sell, the more customers we create for developers. Lastly, it’s tools. I speak one language, I speak English and I would tend to look for places I can go to that speak English, because it’s much easier. And that’s true for developers too, they want to develop in a language they know. That’s one of the reasons we wanted to use our technology called Silverlight, it’s a developer language that people have used for years on the web, so we’ve been able to tap into a set of developers who already know the language in the tools section, and we’ve made that available for free.


"We've learned that the market is bigger than just the business user. The products we built were really for a


customer who had since evolved – we took that in our stride and tried to


deliver on those needs." Aaron Woodman, Microsoft


Do you think Microsoft will make it’s own smartphone again after the failure of the Kin? I don’t know. There’s no doubt in my mind that Microsoft will not give up in the mobile space; that’s one thing I know. I think Microsoft believes that it’s paramount to the success of the company and it’s willing to invest time, take risks and change its strategy if that’s required. I personally believe, and I think the business believes, that we’re better with


NEED TO KNOW:  Windows Phone 7 integrates elements from Microsoft’s portfolio such as Xbox Live, Microsoft Office Mobile, Zune, Windows Live and Bing.  Live tiles show users real-time updates from the web such as news and appointments.  More than 60 mobile operators in over 30 countries worldwide will be offering Windows Phone 7 devices.  The UK’s first smartphones to run the new operating system are the HTC HD7, HTC 7 Mozart, Samsung Omnia 7, HTC 7 Trophy and LG Optimus 7.


partners. There’s more diversity of hardware when you work with partners; they’re trying to create a niche, they’re looking at the individual customers, but I wouldn’t rule anything out. Today, Microsoft wants to be successful in mobile, and I don’t think we see any hard and fast boundaries to that.


Stephen Fry described Windows Phone as the ‘underdog’, would you agree with that? Absolutely – this is a tough, competitive market. We very much feel like we have to be better at listening to our customers, we have to be better at working with the channels, we have to be better at training retail. I think we have a lot of people who


are very passionate about the space and we know in reality that the competition is not going to go away any time soon. I love that, how often is Microsoft the underdog? I do think that’s probably true.


Do you think Microsoft could be the market leader? It’s definitely our aspiration but first and foremost we have to ship a product that when people buy it, they fall in love. So it’s not so much step one: ship the product, step two: take over the world. We all want to sell a lot of phones but I think we’re concerned first that people have a great experience, because that’s going to help us get to the quantity much more than distribution and marketing.


November PCR 83


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126