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Infinite FMS is a specialist field marketing provider delivering bespoke solutions purely for the technology sector. With over ten years experience, we understand how to support manufacturers with the execution of their below-the-line campaigns, ensuring brands are reinforced, product messages are effectively delivered and sales objectives are achieved. Our services include product training, compliance & data capture, promotion & demonstration activity, Mystery Shopping & Roadshows. To learn more about how we can support you, please contact us on 01793 686504 or visit our website at www.infinitefms.com


Can Apple be challenged in the tablet market?


Supported by a huge marketing campaign, the iPad has been the device that’s opened up the tablet category to mainstream audiences. However, despite a slew of competing devices in the pipeline, just over half of respondents feel that these new products don’t stand a chance.


 Don't Know 11%  No 54%  Yes 35%


NEWS BYTES


3 MORE STORES FOR BEST BUY Retail giant Best Buy will open three more stores in Hayes, Rotherham and Enfield during 2011. In Hayes, the store will be located at the Lombardy Shopping Park on Uxbridge Road, and the Rotherham site will be at the Retail World Shopping Park at Parkgate. Both are expected in spring/summer. The store in Enfield will be on Enfield Retail Park on the A10 Great Cambridge Road, and will open in the autumn. Best Buy claims it will create around 100 jobs in each of the Hayes, Rotherham and Enfield stores.


COMET AND GAME TEAM UP KEY RETAILER COMMENTS


“Looking forward to see what the festive season will bring this year”


“Sales of netbooks seem to be dying down now, people have learnt that they are really just for surfing the net”


“Bamboo graphic tablets do better in this store compared to other brands”


“There are too many different laptop models on the market, which can be confusing for the customer”


“University students going back to college has improved sales”


www.pcr-online.biz


Video game retailer GAME is to open a number of concession stores within electrical chain Comet’s UK portfolio. The first will arrive in Comet's Croyden store in mid-October, and a further five will arrive later this year. Between 1,000 and 1,500 square feet will be set aside for the sites, will be staffed by GAME employees and operate as their own concern within the stores. GAME’s Northern European managing director, Martyn Gibbs said: “We’re looking forward to working with the teams at Comet to give customers everything they need as a massive range of games and technology is launched this Christmas.”


BRC WELCOMES GOVERNMENT SPENDING REVIEW


The British Retail Consortium has stated that the Government’s plans to reduce spending struck the right balance between spending cuts and tax rises. According to its own research, uncertainty over where and when the cuts were to be applied contributed to sluggish growth in retail sales figures, with customers putting off discretionary spend due to fears over jobs cuts.


3D TVS NOT SELLING


University students going back to college has improved sales


Research from market analyst DisplaySearch has revealed that 3D TV has failed to live up to expectations, with only 3.2 million sales forecast for this year. The analyst’s findings suggest the market has not grown as predicted due to high prices and a lack of content. However, as prices fall and content becomes more widely available, the researcher predicts that shipments will grow to 90 million in 2014.


November PCR 37


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