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ANALYSIS CLOUD COMPUTING


Industry Opinions


The IT trade has been paying lip service to the cloud for years now, presenting it as revolutionary to the way we use computers. But some have argued that, despite its potential, the concept has so far had a relatively minor effect on most consumers and businesses. This month we ask our panel: What barriers does the cloud face and will it emerge as a world-changing initiative any time soon?


Agent Turnball Geek Squad (Best Buy's service and repair arm)


THESE DAYS we have such a large amount of information stored on databases all over the world it is important to know how to manage the risks posed to internet security when storing data in this way. People should not be afraid to embrace the advancements in technology because in one sense it keeps your data secure in case you lose a physical device – but at the same time, they should be aware of how their information is stored.


Mark Lambert Technical Director, Bear IT


INTEREST IN the cloud is on the increase, but a lot of the negative issues are being overlooked. Current internet infrastructure isn’t capable of supporting cloud solutions. Also, security fears of the cloud have recently been in the news, and there are concerns over redundancy (what happens if you are unable to connect to the cloud from your computer or phone), and migration from your existing setup or solution, which can result in downtime for a business.


Con Mallon


Norton Security Expert, Symantec


STORING personal data on the cloud naturally provokes fears that the service you’re using may lose all your information. However, cloud-based backup is a reality and a necessity, and is working flawlessly for customers all over the world. When was the last time you backed up your data onto a CD or DVD?


Nikki Willcock UK Regional Marketing Manager, SanDisk


FROM A flash market perspective we see cloud storage as a driver of growth in the use of SSD drive technology in the enterprise market. However, we remain convinced that people still want their critical data in their bag or pocket. We see a hybrid experience, with the cloud acting as a back-up, and users will have local storage for key data – and the interface between this data will be seamless. With devices like tablets becoming more popular, this hybrid model will become the norm.


Mark Taylor Director DPE, Microsoft


AS WITH any technology, organisations will face challenges in the move to the cloud. Some will go all in, while others will opt for a more cautious, staged approach. For well over a decade Microsoft has been operating some of the largest and most complex cloud services on the planet. Cloud solutions can help organisations solve many issues, but vendors need to help customers make the right decisions by offering choice.


20 PCR November


David Emm


Senior Security Researcher, Kaspersky Lab


I THINK it is true for most major technological developments that first there’s a major innovation, then the ‘visionaries’ talk about its potential impact. Then it is taken up by the ‘early adopters’. Then it becomes mainstream and its full potential begins to be realised. This was true for web-based commerce, it was true for Web 2.0, and I believe it’s true for the emergence and development of cloud-based services.


Wayne Cockerill Chairman, NBG; Managing Director, Aindale


STATEMENTS THAT the cloud is going to take over the earth bear no relation to the current reality, where early adoption has been slow. However, the industry is beginning to assess what the cloud can offer. With the online version of Microsoft Office fast approaching resellers should consider where it could fit in their models. That said, I still believe it won’t change the world in the next five to ten years, due to the level of internet bandwidth in the UK, as well as security concerns.


Carl West


Business Group Director, GfK


INTERNET APPLICATIONS, services and storage are not new, but the management and offerings over the last three years have definitely improved. Cloud computing in both the home and at work is mainly limited by one thing, bandwidth. All computer users now take for granted accessing files over an internal network but connecting to a WAN can bring fear and in some cases inefficiency. Content and data-rich services still need faster, wider and cleverer networks.


www.pcr-online.biz


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