search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
AVIATION OUTLOOK


(€18 per business class ticket), as well as the “flygskam” (flying shame) phenomenon coming from Sweden. “Right now, there’s increasing pressure to reduce CO2 emissions from air travel. It’s all about carbon offsetting programmes,” states another travel manager.


Plastic-free flights are also an emerging trend for buyers to track. Etihad Airways became the first airline to operate a sin- gle-use plastic-free flight in the ultra-long- haul sector back in April. James Harrison, area general manager UK and Ireland, Etihad Airways, recently stated: “It’s our bid to raise awareness about plastic pollution. We’ve pledged an 80 per cent reduction in single-use plastics by 2022 and we’re set to remove 100 tonnes of single-use plastics from our in-flight service by the end of this year.” Qantas, meanwhile, operated its first commercial flight to send zero onboard waste to landfill. Overall, the airline has pledged to eliminate 75 per cent of its onboard waste by the end of 2021 and use 100 million fewer single-use plastics by the end of 2020.


BEYOND 2020 Looking further ahead, and beyond 2020, experts predict an eventual increase in capacity, and even overcapacity, leading to a downward trend for average fares in the global air market. This is likely to come as the global economy starts to stutter, of which there are already signs, in particular if the US-China trade war heats up. “It’s good news for travel buyers but increasingly difficult for airlines,” says Marco


HALF OF AIRLINES DO NOT OFFER A


CARBON OFFSET SCHEME AND UPTAKE AMONG THOSE THAT DO IS TYPICALLY 0.1 PER CENT OF PASSENGERS


Willa, general manager for UK, Ireland and Iceland sales at Lufthansa Group. ATPI’s Katie Skitterall adds: “This could prove true towards the low season at the end of 2020. This gives travel buyers an opportu- nity to book tactically and not to rely on one airline to meet all their needs.” Potential airline failures should also be closely watched for, especially in Europe. “Buyers would do well to assess the financial stability of airlines often. Carriers suspend flights immediately when they collapse, so you need to ensure there’s a plan of action with the TMC and risk pro- vider, just like an emergency situation,” warns Mervyn Williamson, managing director at Travel and Transport Statesman. No aviation


analysis is complete without factoring in


88


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


2019


buyingbusinesstravel.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158