search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
TECHNOLOGY


Sometimes, though, the best solution is


to be able to talk to a human being. TMC Fello, for example, offers a “high touch” service to those travellers who prefer to speak to a dedicated consultant rather than book online, says Simone Buckley, its chief executive. “Many of our clients come to us as they are disillusioned with the online options and the low level of service and user experience; instead they are looking for the human touch.”


THE RIGHT TOUCHPOINTS For Rebecca Deadman, commercial director at Blue Cube Travel, what is also needed is technology that can prompt this human element at the right touchpoints: “Bookers and travellers know when they absolutely need a human interaction, and the TMC of the future should understand instinctively where these touchpoints need to be. “Technology is no longer seen as a replacement; used well it gives us the ability to scale up, but also still apply the ‘human touch’ of our staff wisely at the time that really counts for our clients. It’s about recognising what can be automated and where human care is needed.” With the upcoming rollout of 5G – the


superfast mobile broadband that could be 100 times faster than standard 4G – now might be the right time to take a look at the way we use technology, reckons design consultant Sabrina Piancastelli. “We live in this age where everything is virtual and we’re becoming almost like machines,” she warns. “Humans are almost forgetting how to interact with other humans, and travelling is about people and serving people.”


A TRAVEL MANAGER’S VIEWPOINT


JULIE FIDLER, global employee experience lead at Microsoft Travel, takes an analytical approach to her programme. She says she uses one


of her company’s own platforms, Microsoft


MyAnalytics. The platform can be used as part of Microsoft


365, and helps users learn ways to “work smarter” by improving their focus, wellbeing and collaboration. For example, it can send


reminders to employees about their work patterns, explains Fidler. “These include metrics


that challenge the employee to consider if they have enough uninterrupted time to get work done and whether they are able to disconnect and recharge,” she adds. At the moment the metrics


do not incorporate business travel specifically but, she says, Microsoft is currently in discussions with its product teams and Fidler emphasises that it’s “important to consider the traveller-specific needs when designing programmes to support employee wellbeing”.


USED WELL,


TECHNOLOGY GIVES US THE ABILITY TO SCALE UP


THE TRAVELLER’S PERSPECTIVE ‘I have to train my brain to not need what I don’t know’ She adds: “We are bombarded with


SABRINA PIANCASTELLI IS A DESIGN CONSULTANT based in the UK – and a frequent flyer. She likes the idea of ubiquitous wifi in the air, as it allows her to get things done. But she also admits that with our increasingly flexible lives, where many people are working from home, it is “difficult to set a clear line between your professional and personal life” and that “most people don’t think about their relationship with technology, they’re just dragged into it and get addicted to it”.


buyingbusinesstravel.com


information and data and it’s hard to zone out. Not everything is relevant and it’s tricky to filter out what’s actually important for you, and there’s this anxiety about being overwhelmed with things. I had FOMO [fear of missing out] and now I have to train my brain to not need what I don’t know, for instance, constantly looking at updates on Facebook. I have to trust that the right information will come to me at the right time.”


2019 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 79


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158