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INFORM


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


DELTA AND VIRGIN TO BOOST TRANSATLANTIC CAPACITY


DELTA AIR LINES AND VIRGIN ATLANTIC will increase capacity on services between the UK and the US in 2020. Beginning 28 March, Delta will increase its JFK-Heathrow services to three


daily year-round frequencies, up from two currently. All together, both carriers will operate eight flights a day on the route. From 29 March, Virgin Atlantic will bolster the partnership’s presence from


Heathrow to Los Angeles and Seattle. LA will see three additional weekly flights for a total of 17 frequencies, while Seattle will get an extra four services a week, bringing the total to 11 weekly. In addition, LA will be the second route to receive Virgin Atlantic’s new Airbus A350 from 2020 after New York. Virgin Atlantic and Delta will also add up to 18 weekly US flights from Gatwick


from 21 May, marking the first time both airlines have served the airport. Delta will operate a daily Boston-Gatwick flight, and Virgin Atlantic will offer a daily JFK-Gatwick service on the renovated Airbus A330-200.


CWT RENEWS US GOVERNMENT CONTRACT


THE US GENERAL SERVICES Administration has renewed its lodging contract with CWTSatoTravel, CWT’s military and government division. Under the government-wide


temporary duty assignment (TDY) lodging contract, the specialist division will continue to provide negotiation and management services to all government agencies and military organisations through the FedRooms and DoD Preferred programmes. CWTSatoTravel’s partnership with the GSA is entering its 16th consecutive year, and the programme grew to more than 2.6 million room nights in the 2018 financial year. CWT said FedRooms saw a cost avoidance of US$30 million last year.


Wratten replaces Parkes as BTA chief


THE BUSINESS TRAVEL ASSOCIATION, formerly the GTMC, has named former Amber Road chief Clive Wratten as its new chief executive following the retirement of Adrian Parkes. Wratten had been with Amber Road (formerly CTI) since 2015. Previously, Wratten was UK general manager at Etihad Airways for eight years. He also has aviation experience with other airlines, including Qantas, Gulf Air and British Airways. As chief executive of the BTA, Wratten is tasked with implementing the association’s new, broadened scope of work. As well as continuing to boost member and industry partner numbers, the BTA is aiming to establish new partnerships


with cross-sector associations. n BTA column, p150


20 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019 buyingbusinesstravel.com


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