search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RAIL TRAVEL


topic, even Network Rail admits its own staff sometimes travel by air because it can be cheaper: “We’re a public body and would be rightly accused of wasting public money sticking rigorously to trains when there are potentially cheaper options,” says Jack Harvey, media relations manager. He says 98 per cent of Network Rail’s business travel is by train on a “best value” basis. Getting travellers to plan ahead remains the key to keeping ticket prices down. At TMC Click Travel, 35 per cent of client bookings are for rail journeys. Chief executive Jill Palmer says: “When we take over an account, we often find trains are being booked last thing as opposed to airline travel.” Palmer adds that the culture of a company may prohibit employees travelling first class, meaning lounges, more comfortable train seats with wifi, charging points and refreshments – critical for optimum working conditions – are missed out on. Crown Commercial Service, which provides commercial services to the public sector, including travel procurement, is one organisation with such a policy, and travel buyer Vasco Neves wants improvements made to standard class for those who need to work on the move. Neves, who says rail accounts for 78 per cent of Crown employees’ domestic business travel, has a specific wishlist: “Improved wifi connectivity, more power sockets as well as more food and drink options – these are a few examples of how the corporate traveller’s experience could be improved.”


EVEN NETWORK RAIL


ADMITS ITS STAFF SOMETIMES TRAVEL BY AIR BECAUSE IT CAN BE CHEAPER


London Paddington and Heathrow SOURCE HEATHROW EXPRESS


the number of people Heathrow Express carries a day between


17,000 EUROPE ON TRACK WITH LOW-COST MODEL


COULD THE UK FOLLOW FRANCE with the introduction of low-cost trains which ape the cost-saving strategies of budget airlines by installing more seats and, in some cases, using alternative, out-of-town points of departure? In July, SNCF rolled out another


route on Ouigo (pictured right), offering Paris to Toulouse for €65, barely more than half the fare on regular trains. This latest low-cost option joins those launched to France’s other biggest cities since the inception of the brand in 2013, which has seen some advance purchase tickets selling for as little as €10 per journey. While Ouigo has been criticised


for lack of connectivity – the tickets cannot be combined with those for Eurostar, for example – the model may be here to stay, given that the EU is


buyingbusinesstravel.com 2019 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 117


opening the door to new entrants in all its member countries from 2020, which is likely to give the current government monopolies a run for their money. SNCF, for example, which owns


Ouigo, will see its budget service directly challenged by FlixTrain (pictured left), a German operator that has already applied to run its own services connecting Paris with Toulouse as well as with Bordeaux, Lyon, Nice and Brussels.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158