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REPORT BACK


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT


I


NADEQUATE TOOLS AND OUTDATED travel management could be costing businesses up to 15 per cent of employees’


time and US$12,000 per year per traveller on admin tasks, according to new research. The study, commissioned by


travel management platform Lola.com, found a “strong correlation” between business travel and business success, but that travel management may need a “rethink”.


Major complaints reported by


714 US-based frequent business travellers included outdated policies and poor booking tool design. This led to 64 per cent of respondents using consumer sites for their business travel management. In addition, 64 per cent said they felt like they were wasting time searching for trips, while 55 per cent saw a negative impact on job productivity as a result. Respondents said they waste


an average of 12 hours per trip on researching, booking, adjusting and cancelling trips, as well as reporting expenses. With those travellers taking an average of nine trips per year, this potentially adds up to 108 hours for a single employee. Staff working at smaller companies spend 70 per cent more time on trip admin than those at larger firms. Meanwhile, 619 travel


managers said the problem lies with the lack of a single platform and support. Half of those surveyed said their companies did not provide any tools. Two in five (39 per cent) noted that if they did have a company- provided tool it lacked support, leaving 64 per cent to rely on spreadsheets and documents for travel management.


36 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019 More than half of travellers


(53 per cent) said they felt their companies’ approach to travel management was wasting money, with half seeing it affect bottom lines. More than two-thirds (67 per cent) of travel managers agreed. While 70 per cent of travellers


overall said travel management influenced job satisfaction, 14 per cent more of those employed by smaller businesses agreed. Fifty-nine per cent said inefficiencies made them “less happy”, while 12 per cent more SME travellers said the same. Furthermore, 44 per cent overall said they might look


DATA 44%


of travellers surveyed said they may look for a new job because of poor travel management


SME STAFF SPEND 70%


more time on trip admin than those at larger firms


2 in 5 travel managers surveyed said their


company-provided tool lacked support


time wasted researching, booking and adjusting a trip per person


12 HOURS SOURCE: THE COST OF DOING BUSINESS TRAVEL, LOLA.COM / KICKSTAND COMMUNICATIONS buyingbusinesstravel.com HALF OF


TRAVELLERS SAID THEIR


COMPANIES’ APPROACH TO TRAVEL


MANAGEMENT WAS WASTING MONEY


well-managed business travel is ‘critical’ for their company success.


“But despite


its importance, companies are failing their employees with


A new report highlights the pitfalls of using outdated travel management tools


for other jobs as a result of poor travel management; that number rose to 73 per cent among SME respondents. Lola.com chief executive


Mike Volpe said: “This research interlinks travel with business success. In fact, 94 per cent cited that


a lack of tools and support, and these inefficiencies are costing big time and money.”


The study was carried out by Kickstand Communications. n Download the free report at lola.com/the-cost-of-doing- business-travel


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