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INFORM


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


YAPTA UNVEILS NEW VERSION OF HOTEL TOOL


AIR FARE AND HOTEL price-tracking technology provider Yapta has released the latest version of its TravelAI Hotel solution. TravelAI Hotel version 2.0 uses analytics


and modelling to provide travel managers with a line of sight into savings achieved by implementing recommendations across sourcing, rate types and policy improvements. According to Yapta, suggestions are


based on near real-time booking data, visibility into point-of-sale rate availability data and pricing data gathered from more than half-a-million bookings each day. It also prescribes the best rate types


to negotiate, assessing both static and dynamic rates based on availability data gathered at the time of booking. Rates are benchmarked against Yapta’s data of more than 8,500 customers, the Best Available Rate (BAR) and contracted rates.


RAIL FARES TO RISE UP TO 2.8% IN 2020


TRAIN USERS WILL BE HIT by another rise in ticket prices next year, with average rail fares due to increase by up to 2.8 per cent. The Rail Delivery Group (RDG) ties fare rises to the


Retail Prices Index (RPI) inflation measure, which for July was 2.8 per cent. This means many commuters will likely see an increase of more than £100 in the annual cost of their season tickets. Passenger rights groups such as the Campaign for


Better Transport have repeatedly called for rail fares to be tied to the lower Consumer Prices Index (CPI), which is the more widely used measure of inflation and came in at 2.1 per cent in July. Robert Nisbet, director of nations and regions for


RDG, said: “No one wants to pay more to get to work but by holding rises down to no more than inflation, money from fares will continue to cover almost all of the day-to-day costs of running rail services. This means private sector and taxpayer money can go towards improving services for the long term.” But the TUC trade union said rail fares have risen “at


twice the speed of wages since 2009” at 46 per cent compared to 23 per cent.


SAUDI ARABIA PLANS LONG-RANGE HYPERLOOP


VIRGIN HYPERLOOP ONE has partnered with Saudi Arabia’s Economic City Authority to conduct a study to build the world’s first long-range track to test hyperloop technology. As part of the agreement, the partners will also build a research and


development centre and manufacturing facility north of Jeddah. Hyperloop technology aims to power a super-fast transport system


that uses electric propulsion to accelerate a passenger cargo pod through a low-pressure tube at speeds of up to 700mph. Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson said the technology could make it possible to travel from Edinburgh to London in 50 minutes. The project will include a 35km test and certification track and will


create opportunities for the development of specific technologies and local expertise that can be commercialised and scaled.


22


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


2019


buyingbusinesstravel.com


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