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COMPILED BY MAT THEW PARSONS


IN FOCUS


1


THE ANALYST Tom Roberts head of intelligence and analysis services, Drum Cussac


A NO-DEAL BREXIT presents the worst case for travellers. Despite no parliamentary support, it remains the legislative default outcome. The primary effects will be market instability, and unrest. The effi- ciency of cross-border travel also remains uncertain. Travellers to the EU may have to prove onward journeys and their ability to support their stay financially. Expect a dra- matic effect on financial markets, including devaluation in the pound in anticipation of no-deal. The cost of goods and services will increase, and there may be panic-buying akin to the 2000 fuel protests. There will likely be protests, which may involve limited-scale violence. Second-order consequences could see protests hijacked by groups with broader aims, and, in an extreme scenario, looting similar to the 2011 London riots. Northern Ireland faces the greatest prospect of violence, especially if a hard border is introduced.


3


THE CONSULTANT Judith Heinrich managing director, Travelicity Consulting


SIGHT


AS WE APPROACH BREXIT, which looks likely to be a no-deal one, travel managers must ensure they don’t forget the following issues. For your EU staff, ensure they have applied for their settled (or pre-settled) status. Support them where possible if they require any additional documentation to present their application. With employee passports, ensure they all have a minimum validity of six months. When it comes to travel insurance, the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will no longer be valid, so make sure your travellers are covered by adequate travel insurance. For those staff driving abroad, they will need an international driving permit – it’s easily done at the post office for a fee of just £5.50. And don’t forget green cards for car insurance, because in case of a no-deal Brexit, those drivers will need a green card from their insurance company to drive a car in an EU country.


buyingbusinesstravel.com


As the UK hurtles towards a


no-deal Brexit, how could travel be impacted?


2 4


THE TRAVEL & MEETINGS EXPERT Raj Sachdave managing partner, Black Box Partnerships


IT’S UNCERTAIN AS TO how deep the impact of Brexit will be immediately on travellers, regardless of a hard or soft parting. But there will be complexity and inconsis- tency, meaning business travellers (both inbound and outbound) will face a level of confusion. Travel managers will need to work more closely with teams internally to understand the need to travel during the period of change. They’ll also need to work more collaboratively to ensure safety and integrity isn’t compromised. The insurance markets have started to get closer to businesses and TMCs, offering greater protection in cover and repatria- tion services, should this be required for travelling executives. Our advice is: work with internal stakeholders to smartly forecast travel, and be transparent with your TMC which has the skills, network and relationships to support the change period of Brexit.


THE TAX EXPERT Gareth Kobrin chief executive, VATGlobal and executive director, VATIT


IT WILL EITHER BE A NO-DEAL, or a rushed-deal Brexit. Unfortunately, laws will change overnight, suddenly and drastically, including those related to VAT, and there will be a material impact on businesses. There are many complicated VAT implica- tions of Brexit, things such as import VAT and business travellers paying 20 per cent on hotel stays. It’s OK if you’ve got the tech- nology, integrated with a tax partner, but if you still use spreadsheets, or an archaic system, you’re not going to be compliant with the local tax authorities, and bring yourself open to an audit, or rejected claims. If your traveller policy doesn’t cater for that, and your technology doesn’t care for that, there are big concerns. I believed in the beginning the government would sort out big things like immigration, and customs union, then they could focus on simplifying VAT. We’re probably too late for that now.


2019 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 7


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