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INFORM


WORDS MOLLY DYSON


GATWICK AIRPORT REVEALS MASTERPLAN FOR GROWTH


FOLLOWING A 12-WEEK public consultation, Gatwick airport has released its final masterplan, which includes its intention to use its standby runway for departures by the mid-2020s. Under the plans, the airport will submit an


application to bring its standby runway – which is currently only used in emergencies – into regular use for departing flights. The airport says it will issue a Development Consent Order, which will include a public consultation to allow local authorities, communities, businesses and partners the opportunity to weigh in on the scheme. Contrary to claims by the Communities Against


Gatwick Noise and Emissions (CAGNE) group, the airport says it is not pursuing a third runway at this time, but will continue to recommend that national and local planning policy continues to safeguard land that may be required for a new runway in the future, as it has done since 2003.


TRAVEL WARNING IF NO-DEAL BREXIT


BUSINESS TRAVELLERS HAVE BEEN warned they could face trouble trying to enter the EU if there is a no-deal Brexit, according to experts. Consultancy EY told the Financial


Times that people travelling to the EU for business without the right authorisation may have to obtain work permits on a country-by-country basis, which could take months to secure if immigration rules are enforced. The European Commission has


proposed visa-free travel for stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period following Brexit, so long as Britain reciprocates. However, the UK government


says those needing to work or study during their trip – other than attending meetings, networking events, or conferences – may require a visa. According to the CBI, some countries,


such as Germany, have prepared waivers for UK workers on stays of up to three months. Others may enforce tighter restrictions that prohibit financial services employees from conducting trading, for example.


32 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019


TRAVELPORT NAMES NEW CEO


TRAVELPORT HAS ANNOUNCED Greg Webb as its new chief executive as Gordon Wilson prepares to step down. Webb brings more than 20 years’ experience in the


travel technology industry, most recently as senior vice-president and general manager of Oracle Hospitality, where he was responsible for strategy, enablement, development, sales, service and support. Prior to this, he was vice-chairman of Sabre. At Sabre, Webb worked


on product development and marketing, and ultimately led the company’s largest business unit, Sabre Travel Network. Travelport was


acquired by Siris Capital and Evergreen Coast Capital for US$4.4 billion in December 2018.


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