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FEATURE SPONSOR


or ladders. If you prefer a shoe, the Mascot Diran holds the same properties as the Mascot Rimo.


Safety footwear should have a correct fit and hold the properties needed in your profession. To avoid accidental slips, trips and falls the company recommend that you choose safety footwear with the best standard within slip resistant soles, SRC.


ESD APPROVED FOOTWEAR KEEPS YOU EXTRA SAFE


If you are working in electrostatic environments, it is important with ESD approved footwear and both the safety boot Mascot Bimberi Peak as well as the shoe version Mascot Mont Blanc are both ESD approved. The insoles are shock- absorbing and the footwear is completely free of metal. The composite toecap does not conduct heat or cold, which gives you extra comfort.


FALL PROTECTION


VISIONS FOR THE FUTURE OF WIND TURBINE RESCUE


ONE OF THE MAJOR CAUSES FOR SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS WITHIN THE WORKPLACE IS INCORRECT USE OF SAFETY FOOTWEAR


Wind turbines present a formidable working environment and the risk of an emergency is ever-present. The following text depicts how an emergency could manifest itself


REAL WORLD SCENARIO


BOA CLOSURE IS A GREAT ALTERNATIVE TO LACES


Even though you are required to frequently put on and remove shoes at work, the shoes’ fit is still important. Choosing footwear with the Boa closure system ensures that the safety footwear always has a good fit.


The disc with a stainless steel wire allows the wearer to open and close the footwear efficiently. The safety shoes/ boot will fit perfectly at the foot and give optimal comfort and all safety footwear from MASCOT is certified according to EN ISO 20345.


MASCOT SCAN/CLICK SCAN/CLICK


Crouching inside a white box, 170m above the North Sea, the technicians jump as an alarm rips through the silence. Fear sets in an instant as the smell of electrical smoke hits the nostrils of the technician nearest to the yawl gear. Four technicians go pale, then one screams: “Over here, on me now, I’m setting up the escape set!” A sense of order filters through the smoke, cognitive reflexes react and the escape hatch opens. Descending at 2m per second the rescue kit will take approximately 80 seconds to reach the TP.


INCREASED ANXIETY


The nacelle temperature increases and smoke replaces the sense of order, genuine terror races out of the dark and dives into the minds of the technicians, gloves become soaked with sweat and salt stings their eyes.


PLAY VIDEO MORE INFO


Who goes first? One technician is not wearing his harness… Two technicians attach themselves to the rescue kit and begin their descent. The nacelle temperature increases as the two remaining technicians try to focus, counting down the seconds, willing the rescue rope to stop. The alarm sounded two minutes and twenty-five seconds ago.


ESCAPE


Finally, the rope is free. They attach themselves and try to descend but a lanyard snags delaying them further. Their journey to safety begins, three terrifying minutes and five seconds after the alarm sounded.


REDUCING THE RISKS


Solutions for multiple-user evacuation devices are now available, which enable loads of upto 360kg to descend in one go. That’s four technicians with their risk minimised and evacuation assured, in one descent. But what if no rescue kit is available, or if the technicians are unable to reach it? Personal/individual micro-descent devices are available which are flame- proof (Kevlar) and are certified for 200m descents.


The factor of safety is lower (due to the minimal rope diameter), but considering the ultimate consequence, provide a reliable and effective evacuation solution for those in the greatest of need.


Cresto


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


95


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