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RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME


“The East of England is a very exciting place to be in the energy business. More than 20 of our clients operate in the sector, mainly in Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft and find themselves in the right place at the right time to capitalise on the outstanding opportunities, particularly in offshore wind. “The area’s reputation as an energy hub of national importance was built on more than 50 years of experience in the Southern North Sea gas fields and companies who made their mark then are now using their experience and skills in the construction and maintenance of wind turbines.


PRIDE


“The East of England has long been proud of its innovative approach and talent for cost-reduction. We’re now seeing our clients use similar techniques in the offshore wind sector, where they have helped to drive down the cost from £140MWh in 2011 to less than £100WHh today.”


EAST OF ENGLAND ENERGY GROUP (EEEGR)


Many of TMS Media’s clients are members of EEEGR, whose Chief Executive Simon Gray said: “Our region is at the very centre of one of the most dramatic and profound transitions in Europe’s energy economy. “We are witnessing a fascinating and challenging period as the UK moves to reduce its carbon footprint and close its coal-fired generating capacity. The


country is also seeing a reduction in nuclear generation as we decommission much of our nuclear power stations. “So, what will be powering the nation?” he asked.


ENERGY HISTORY


Simon continued: “The Southern North Sea (SNS) has been producing gas for more than half a century and has seen renewed interest in previously difficult to get at reserves. The Oil & Gas Authority (OGA) has worked with EEEGR to form an SNS Rejuvenation Special Interest Group (SIG) examining how the oil & gas sector and the offshore wind sector might work more closely together, perhaps by sharing resources and vessels or adopting joint training systems and standards to reduce costs. “The offshore wind sector in the East of England is growing rapidly, with hot spots of activity around Great Yarmouth, Lowestoft and Harwich.”


WIND ENERGY


He added: “Windfarms in the region included Dudgeon (Statoil and partners Statkraft and the UK Green Investment Bank), Galloper (innogy SE and partners Green Investment Bank, Macquarie Capital and Siemens Financial Services) and East Anglia ONE (Scottish Power Renewables). Future rounds of Contracts for Difference projects were being considered and the region would see more activity from these players and others, including Vattenfall and Dong.


MORE INFO


“In addition to gas and offshore wind, the region looks likely to benefit from continued nuclear production at Sizewell B, as well as the likely construction of the Sizewell C and Bradwell B plants, which would be among the UK’s largest civil engineering projects.


UNIQUE ENERGY MIX


“This unique mix of energy production led to the formation of EEEGR in 2000 and the organisation now has over 300 members across renewables, nuclear, oil & gas and conventional generation, as well as its supply chain and skills providers. Membership ranges from multinationals such as EDF, Shell, BP and SSE to SMEs and sole traders.”


TMS SCAN/CLICK


06 Ports & Port Services 12 Recruitment 18 Training 24 Operations & Maintenance 34 Market Opportunities 40 Research & Innovation 46 Logistics 52 Support Services


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


5


SPOTLIGHT ON EAST OF ENGLAND


CONTENTS


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